rigidity


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rigidity

 [rĭ-jid´ĭ-te]
inflexibility or stiffness.
clasp-knife rigidity increased tension in the extensor of a joint when it is passively flexed, giving way suddenly on exertion of further pressure; seen especially in upper motor neuron disease. Called also clasp-knife reflex.
cogwheel rigidity tension in a muscle that gives way in little jerks when the muscle is passively stretched; seen in parkinson's disease.
decerebrate rigidity see decerebrate rigidity.
decorticate rigidity see decorticate rigidity.
paratonic rigidity an intermittent abnormal increase in resistance to passive movement in a comatose patient.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē),
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
See also: nuchal rigidity. Synonym(s): rigor (1)
2. In psychiatry and clinical psychology, an aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
3. In neurology, one type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and lead-pipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigidity

Forensic pathology Rigor. See Rigor mortis Neurology Excessive muscle tone. See Extrapyramidal syndrome, Lead pipe rigidity, Parkinsonism Psychiatry An unreasonable resistance to change Vox populi Stiffness.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
Synonym(s): rigor (1) .
2. psychiatry, clinical psychology An aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
3. neurology One type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and leadpipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigidity

Sustained muscle tension causing the affected part of the body to become stiff and inflexible. Rigidity may be due to muscle injury, neurological disease such as PARKINSON'S DISEASE, underlying inflammation as in PERITONITIS, or arthritis in an adjacent joint. See also SPASTICITY.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
Stiffness or inflexibility.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]
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