rigidity


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rigidity

 [rĭ-jid´ĭ-te]
inflexibility or stiffness.
clasp-knife rigidity increased tension in the extensor of a joint when it is passively flexed, giving way suddenly on exertion of further pressure; seen especially in upper motor neuron disease. Called also clasp-knife reflex.
cogwheel rigidity tension in a muscle that gives way in little jerks when the muscle is passively stretched; seen in parkinson's disease.
decerebrate rigidity see decerebrate rigidity.
decorticate rigidity see decorticate rigidity.
paratonic rigidity an intermittent abnormal increase in resistance to passive movement in a comatose patient.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē),
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
See also: nuchal rigidity. Synonym(s): rigor (1)
2. In psychiatry and clinical psychology, an aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
3. In neurology, one type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and lead-pipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigidity

/ri·gid·i·ty/ (rĭ-jid´ĭ-te) inflexibility or stiffness.
clasp-knife rigidity  increased tension in the extensors of a joint when it is passively flexed, giving way suddenly on exertion of further pressure.
cogwheel rigidity  tension in a muscle which gives way in little jerks when the muscle is passively stretched.
decerebrate rigidity  rigid extension of an animal's legs as a result of decerebration; occurring in humans as a result of lesions in the upper brainstem.

rigidity

[rijid′itē]
Etymology: L, rigere, to be stiff
a condition of hardness, stiffness, or inflexibility. rigid, adj.

rigidity

Forensic pathology Rigor. See Rigor mortis Neurology Excessive muscle tone. See Extrapyramidal syndrome, Lead pipe rigidity, Parkinsonism Psychiatry An unreasonable resistance to change Vox populi Stiffness.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
Synonym(s): rigor (1) .
2. psychiatry, clinical psychology An aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
3. neurology One type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and leadpipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigidity

Sustained muscle tension causing the affected part of the body to become stiff and inflexible. Rigidity may be due to muscle injury, neurological disease such as PARKINSON'S DISEASE, underlying inflammation as in PERITONITIS, or arthritis in an adjacent joint. See also SPASTICITY.

rigidity

resistance to imposed movement, characteristic of Parkinson's disease
  • cogwheel rigidity alternating compliance with and resistance to imposed (passive) movement of arms/legs

  • lead pipe rigidity initial resistance to imposed (passive) arm/leg movement with later movement compliance; after the clinician has overcome initial resistance to movement, the patient's limb can be moved passively, slowly and smoothly

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
Stiffness or inflexibility.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigidity,

n the characteristic of being nonflexible, which is essential in a connector, a reciprocal arm, or an indirect retaining unit of a removable partial denture.

rigidity

inflexibility or stiffness.

clasp-knife rigidity
increased tension in the extensor of a joint when it is passively flexed, giving way suddenly on exertion of further pressure; seen especially in upper motor neuron disease.
cogwheel rigidity
tension in a muscle that gives way in little jerks when the muscle is passively stretched.
lead-pipe rigidity
posture adopted when the rigidity of the limb is maintained equally throughout the passive flexion.
rigidity reflex
the state of immobility generated in female animals, especially those in estrus, when they make physical contact with a male.
References in periodicals archive ?
The type of money illusion required to generate downward nominal wage rigidity has received some support from survey evidence in which a large majority of respondents indicated they would prefer a 7 per cent money wage increase when inflation was 12 per cent to a 5 per cent money wage cut when prices were stable.
In this subset of patients, PT-141 showed a significant effect on both duration of erection with base rigidity greater than 60% (P<0.
The potential implosion of Social Security is reinforcing government's propensity to enforce rigidity.
Furthermore, to determine whether nominal wage rigidity is instrumental in explaining fluctuations, one needs to know what patterns would be implied without rigidities.
Levodopa relieved rigidity, but some patients also experienced nausea, heart problems, dangerous drops in blood pressure and dyskinesia, or uncontrollable, wild movements.
Some men choose to receive an implanted device that increases rigidity of the penis.
The striking motor abnormalities of Parkinson's disease (PD)-akinesia, tremor, rigidity and postural instability--upon which clinical diagnosis depends have to date eluded satisfactory physiological explanation.
The technological assault combines with this organizational rigidity to produce one additional circumstance that necessitates changing the model, namely, an unproductive anxiety.
Price rigidity is thus a necessary condition for nominal disturbances to cause output fluctuations.
In keeping with the theme of nomadic hybridization, the floor grid, stereotypically "Germanic" in its rigidity, had been reprocessed into a kind of indiscriminate prime matter from which new configurations might arise.
tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia -- this is not the case for its primary psychological symptomatology (Dakof & Mendelsohn, 1986).