rigidity

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rigidity

 [rĭ-jid´ĭ-te]
inflexibility or stiffness.
clasp-knife rigidity increased tension in the extensor of a joint when it is passively flexed, giving way suddenly on exertion of further pressure; seen especially in upper motor neuron disease. Called also clasp-knife reflex.
cogwheel rigidity tension in a muscle that gives way in little jerks when the muscle is passively stretched; seen in parkinson's disease.
decerebrate rigidity see decerebrate rigidity.
decorticate rigidity see decorticate rigidity.
paratonic rigidity an intermittent abnormal increase in resistance to passive movement in a comatose patient.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē),
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
See also: nuchal rigidity. Synonym(s): rigor (1)
2. In psychiatry and clinical psychology, an aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
3. In neurology, one type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and lead-pipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigidity

Forensic pathology Rigor. See Rigor mortis Neurology Excessive muscle tone. See Extrapyramidal syndrome, Lead pipe rigidity, Parkinsonism Psychiatry An unreasonable resistance to change Vox populi Stiffness.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
Synonym(s): rigor (1) .
2. psychiatry, clinical psychology An aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
3. neurology One type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and leadpipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]

rigidity

Sustained muscle tension causing the affected part of the body to become stiff and inflexible. Rigidity may be due to muscle injury, neurological disease such as PARKINSON'S DISEASE, underlying inflammation as in PERITONITIS, or arthritis in an adjacent joint. See also SPASTICITY.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
Stiffness or inflexibility.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]
References in periodicals archive ?
Price rigidities are thought of as costs or psychological barriers to price changes (Andersen, 1994).
Price stickiness is based on the preferences of market participants, or in other words, rigidities are a natural characteristic of market prices.
The closed and open economy literatures work on estimating real rigidities, but in parallel.
(1.) The term "real rigidities" is used to capture reasons why firms do not want to move their price relative to the industry price level by much, even when they can adjust prices.
In general, the literature review suggests that there is no consensus on the magnitude and role of nominal rigidities in the estimated price-setting process.
In the final paper of this issue, Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe and Martin Uribe discuss the implications of nominal price rigidities for optimal monetary policy.
With respect to the effect of the level of education and market rigidities on ICT diffusion, one important aspect has, to our knowledge, not yet been mentioned in the literature, namely the fact that the effect has changed considerably over time.
The estimated factor demand equation is complemented by adding indicators for the level of education and market rigidities to the list of explanatory variables.
Presently, the structural rigidities in the labor market lead to higher unemployment, not to inflation.
While the main characteristics of the distribution of wage changes appear to be well documented and relatively uncontroversial, (10) the impact of these rigidities at an aggregate level is considerably less well established.
The second large chapter deals with nominal rigidities. This includes static and dynamic models of adjustment costs, rational models of irrational behavior and a comparison of real and nominal rigidities.
Using the data in table 2, MSP rigidities in daN/mm result as follows: