right-to-know law


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right-to-know law

A law that dictates that employers must inform their employees of the health effects and chemical hazards of the toxic substances used in each workplace. The employer must provide information concerning the generic and chemical names of the substances used; the level at which the exposure is hazardous; the effects of exposure at hazardous levels; the symptoms of such effects; the potential for flammability, explosion, and reactivity of the substances; the appropriate emergency treatment; proper conditions for safe use and exposure to the substances; and procedures for cleanup of leaks and spills. The law provides that an employee may refuse to work with a toxic substance until he or she has received information concerning its potential for hazard.
See: hazardous material; health hazard; material safety data sheet; permissible exposure limits
See also: law
References in periodicals archive ?
In short, just as CRA by empowering citizens changed the way banks think, the TRI and right-to-know laws have changed the way industrial companies think.
That's who the community's right-to-know law is for - our children.
Still, new horror stories continue to turn up: paperwork provided by right-to-know laws in January revealed the Monsanto Corporation's decades-long cover up of its massive dumping of PCBs--an environmental hazard and probable human carcinogen--in Anniston, Alabama.
While right-to-know laws are aimed at reducing the supply of POPs, financial tools such as taxes are well-suited to reducing demand.
Community-right-to-know has greatly helped to reduce chemical hazards, to get companies to take notice of, and take responsibility for, community safety," says Paul Orum, coordinator of the Working Group on Community Right-to-Know, a nonprofit organization that tracks government and industry compliance with community right-to-know laws nationwide.
The right-to-know law applies whenever employees could be exposed to any hazardous chemical under normal work conditions or in a foreseeable emergency.
Under the Right-to-Know Law, school employees can request and receive information listed in the labor law concerning toxic substance hazards in the workplace, refuse to work with toxic substances if information was requested and not received within 72 hours and exercise any right under the law without fear of discrimination.
Under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Law, you can obtain information about hazardous chemicals (but not pesticides) in your community.
The second case involved LLS's unsuccessful efforts to obtain LSA's protected trade secret information under Pennsylvania's Right-to-Know Law (RTKL).
Since the purpose of the Right-to-Know Law is to help the public understand what the government is up to, it makes sense for the PUC to resolve what's public and what isn't through the lens of what evidence in the record forms the basis of what the PUC actually decided.
is now in compliance with the federal right-to-know law and has agreed to pay $77,000 to settle claims.