right-to-die


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Related to right-to-die: Right to death

right-to-die

Medical ethics A philosophical stance essentially equivalent to a DNR order, to be honored outside of a hospital or health care setting. See Do not resuscitate.
References in periodicals archive ?
My work to explore whether, and how, veterans of the women's health movement might engage with and shape the right-to-die movement is ongoing.
"Mental suffering is invisible to the human eye," says thirty-four-year-old Kristy Martin, who attended the World Federation of Right-to-Die Societies conference in Chicago.
The right-to-die perspective has been criticized as lacking cultural awareness and applicability with people from a variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds (Kwak & Haley, 2005).
In an interview with the Tages-Anzeiger, Widmer-Schlumpf said, "We don't wish to become a land of death tourism, on the other hand, we don't want to ban right-to-die organisations.
Physician-assisted suicide is also associated with the right-to-die movement, which gained momentum in the 1970's as medical advances kept individuals living who previously would have died.
CORRECTION: Before the court-ordered death of Terri Schiavo, most of the mass media tried to present this as a "right-to-die" issue, when what was involved was a "right to kill"--to kill a severely handicapped woman.
This week it was revealed that an Irish man, severely disabled after an accident, was brought by his family to Switzerland, where a right-to-die group assisted his suicide.
The courts' rulings gave rise to the right-to-die movement.
A RIGHT-TO-DIE campaigner who took a fatal dose of drugs may not have had terminal cancer after all, according to a doctor.
Right-to-die campaigner Diane Pretty asked friends and family to 'remember me with a smile' in a letter she wrote on her deathbed, read out at her funeral yesterday.
TERMINALLY-ILL Diane Pretty, 43, today lost her right-to-die case at the European Court of Human Rights.
DENVER - The Hemlock Society, a right-to-die group, said Wednesday that it will launch a national campaign urging President Bush to block a federal order undercutting physician-assisted suicide in Oregon.