right-handed

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Related to right-hander: Left handedness

right-hand·ed

(rīt'hand-ĕd),
Denoting the habitual or more skillful use of the right hand for writing and most manual operations.
Synonym(s): dextral, dextromanual

right-handed

(rīt′hăn′dĭd)
adj.
1.
a. Using the right hand more skillfully or easily than the left.
b. Sports Swinging from the right to the left: a right-handed batter.
2.
a. Done with the right hand.
b. Intended for wear on or use by the right hand: a right-handed pair of scissors.
3.
a. Turning or spiraling from left to right; clockwise.
b. Rotating clockwise; dextrorotatory.
adv.
1. With the right hand.
2. Sports From right to left: swings right-handed.

right′-hand′ed·ly adv.
right′-hand′ed·ness n.

right-hand·ed

(rīt-hand'ĕd)
Denoting the habitual or more skillful use of the right hand for writing and most manual operations.
Synonym(s): dextral.

right-hand·ed

(rīt-hand'ĕd)
Denoting habitual or more skillful use of right hand for writing and most manual activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chunichi right-hander Kenta Asakura was charged with five runs in four innings.
Rookie Yakult right-hander Tatsuyoshi Masubuchi allowed one hit, walked two and hit a batter in three scoreless innings.
Dr Lynn Wright, who led the study in Dundee, believes the results could be due to wiring differences in the brains of left and right-handers.
Left-handers are more likely to hesitate whereas right-handers tend to jump in a bit more," she said.
The survey also showed that only five per cent of left-handers reckoned they were at a disadvantage in learning to drive, although 27 per cent believed cars were designed with right-handers in mind.
Scientists have uncovered a new brain difference between right-handers and lefthanders.
And male right-handers are 17% more likely to have had an accident that was their fault than left-handers, a survey from motor insurance company First Alternative found.
There are some data suggesting that left-handers have a more equitable distribution of motor and cognitive skills across brain hemispheres than right-handers (SN: 8/17/85, p.
A psychologist at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, has uncovered what appears to be a fundamental difference between the brains of right-handers and those of left- and mixed-handers.