privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
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Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
He also submitted that the government has already taken a stand that there is a right to privacy.
For example, an HIV positive person's right to privacy does not mean that he could endanger the life of his future wife.
Justice Rohinton Fali Nariman, who was on the bench of nine judges, had in his judgement said that the challenge to the validity of Aadhaar on the grounds of its being violative of the right to privacy would be adjudicated by the original bench of three judges in the light of the decision elevating right to privacy as a fundamental right.
In addition, tech companies using your data will also have to take right to privacy into account now.
Her study pivots around three comparative examinations of dominant models of privacy protection--American, European, and Canadian--each of which employs specific vocabulary to express the concept of right to privacy and uses different regulatory techniques of approaching the given issue.
This Note proposes that Alaskan courts should adopt a coherent, purposeful approach to balancing Alaskans' codified right to privacy with the state's interest in protecting its people.
Whether the Right to Privacy is a fundamental right guaranteed under Part III of the Constitution of India, in the light of express ratio to the contrary by an eight- judge bench in M P Sharma case and also by a sixjudge bench of this court in Kharaksingh's case", one of the questions raised by Attorney General Mukul Rohatgi, who appeared for the Centre, reads.
The United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) has elevated the right to privacy and the freedom from excessive surveillance to a priority by appointing a privacy expert or rapporteur.
The resolution called on the 193 UN member states "to review their procedures, practices and legislation regarding the surveillance of communications, their interception and collection of personal data, with a view to upholding the right to privacy of all their obligations under international human rights law".
Should the legal right to privacy be considered a fundamental right of all humans and extended beyond national borders (not to mention returned to certain jurisdictions where it has been extremely undermined)?
1,7] This article attempts to build on earlier work, by comprehensively setting out the nature and sources of a child's right to privacy regarding health interventions, and by developing four key norms which can be applied to a range of HIV-prevention studies.
In a democracy it might be considered fair that those who hold extreme views should give up their right to privacy if they decided to exercise their right to free speech.