privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
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Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
That "line of demarkation which separates the right of privacy from the well-established rights of others" (104) is drawn according to third-party harms:
Any analysis of a constitutional right of privacy must be founded on an understanding of the underlying premise for the right.
This assumption was, in no way, affected by Morning's efforts to exercise her own right of privacy by denying consent to search.
Another constitutional attack waged against the admissibility of surreptitiously recorded conversations is the claim that monitoring and recording these conversations violates the suspects' fourth amendment right of privacy.