privacy

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pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
Florida's Constitutional Right of Privacy. In 1980, Florida became the fourth state to add to its constitution the right of its people to be free from invasion of their privacy, (19) in sweeping language:
In his special concurring opinion, Justice Overton expressed his concern "that we have not applied a balancing test I believe is required by the right of privacy provision contained in Art.
119 trumped the doctor's right of privacy, once the information made its way into his employment records.
The right of privacy is a fundamental right which we believe demands the compelling state interest standard.
We find that, under appropriate circumstances, the constitutional right of privacy established in Florida by the adoption of article I, section 23, could form a constitutional basis for closure under (e) or (f).
In this case, the court addressed the conflict between the media's right of access under Florida Public Records Act (58) and a public employee's right of privacy claim to restrict media access to certain personal information contained in his employment records.
(34.) Justice Goldberg, concurring and joined by two others, emphasized the Ninth Amendment, but he limited his reading in the same way by emphasizing the "basic and fundamental" nature of the "right of privacy in marriage." Griswold, 381 U.S.
1980) (holding that a newspaper could obtain the names and addresses of delinquent public housing tenants because they waived their right of privacy by not paying on time, and the public has an interest in knowing who abuses the state's credit); Gouldman-Taber Pontiac, Inc.
at 51 ("Assuming, without deciding, that no fundamental interest is at stake (i.e., the right of privacy), so that strict scrutiny of the classification is not required, the classification still denies equal protection....").