right coronary artery


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Related to right coronary artery: small cardiac vein, Left anterior descending artery

right cor·o·nar·y ar·ter·y (RCA),

[TA]
origin, right aortic sinus; distribution, it passes around the right side of the heart in the coronary sulcus, giving branches to the right atrium and ventricle, including the atrioventricular branches, the sinuatrial nodal branch, the right marginal artery, the atrioventricular nodal branch, and the posterior interventricular branch.
Synonym(s): arteria coronaria dextra [TA]

right cor·o·nar·y ar·te·ry

(rīt kōr'ŏ-nar-ē ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, right aortic sinus; distribution, it passes around the right side of the heart in the coronary sulcus, giving branches to the right atrium and ventricle, including the atrioventricular branches and the posterior interventricular branch.
Synonym(s): arteria coronaria dextra [TA] .

right coronary artery

Abbreviation: RCA
One of the two main epicardial arteries that feed the heart muscle. It originates from the right aortic sinus, a dilation in the aorta just behind one of the leaflets of the aortic valve. It runs to the right along the outside of the heart in the atrioventricular groove, i.e., the coronary sulcus, between the atria and the ventricles. Usually, its two main branches are the right marginal artery and the posterior descending artery. Among the heart regions it supplies are the sinoatrial (SA) and atrioventricular (AV) nodes, the right ventricle, the right atrium, and often, the inferior or posterior wall of the left ventricle.
Synonym: right main coronary artery See: aorta (Branches of aorta) and heart (The heart) for illus.
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
Double right coronary artery and its clinical significance: Review of the literature.
Klues, "Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery: preoperative and postoperative hemodynamics," The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol.
LAO = left anterior oblique view, LCA = left coronary artery, and RCA = right coronary artery.
Caption: Figure 2: Coronary angiography image of our patient showing a localized spontaneous right coronary artery dissection to its middle segment with atheromatous aspect.
The right coronary artery was wired and an attempt was made to aspirate possible thrombus from the distal RCA using an Export catheter.
The right coronary artery originating from the aorta was visualized as tortuous and enlarged and the left coronary artery could not be visualized completely (Figure 3).
Right coronary artery (RCA) of chagasic hearts (G1) exhibited significantly lower mean luminal areas than IDCM (G2), both in proximal (4.3 [+ or -] 1.4 vs 6.6 [+ or -] 2.0 [mm.sup.2]) p=0.05 and distal segments (1.6 [+ or -] 1.0 vs 3.4 [+ or -] 0.9 [mm.sup.2]), p= 0.01(Tukey test).
An autopsy revealed severe proximal coronary artery disease of the left main coronary artery, left anterior descending coronary artery, and right coronary artery, as well as evidence of "remote and recent myocardial infarction."
The pattern of the CAs in the pig was similar to that of the humans and the right coronary artery (RCA) was the dominant artery (1-3).
The anatomic abnormalities found in coronary arteries were: left trunk absence, (4); two right coronary arteries with an individual ostium each, (1); a circumflex artery originating from the right sinus, (2) and retrocardiac trajectory, (1); duplication of vessels, (6); anterior origin of the right coronary artery, (1); a right coronary artery originating from the left sinus of Valsalva and interarterial trajectory, (4); intramyocardial bridge, (3); retroaortic exit from the circumflex artery, (1); exit of the three vessels from the right coronary sinus, (1); a high right coronary artery ostium, (1); an arteriovenous fistula, (1); and a mammary artery branch from the first diagonal artery, (1).
* BACKGROUND Differentiating occlusion of the circumflex branch of the left coronary artery (also called the circumflex artery) from occlusion of the right coronary artery is often difficult because either may be associated with a pattern of acute inferior myocardial infarction on the electrocardiogram.
In 4 cases (11%) the right coronary artery had an anomalous origin from the left coronary sinus.