right bundle branch block


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right bundle branch block

Cardiology A condition in which the electrical impulse from the bundle of His to the ventricles is delayed or fails to conduct along the right bundle branch, resulting in right ventricular depolarization by cell-to-cell conduction spreading from the interventricular septum and left ventricle to the right ventricle–ie, slow and uncoordinated Natural history Surgically induced RBBB has few acute hemodynamic consequences and a generally benign course long term; rarely, progression to complete heart block and sudden death occur, especially if accompanied by major His-Purkinje system–eg, left anterior hemiblock, first-degree AV block–injury; tetralogy of Fallot repair with an RBBB and a markedly prolonged QRS duration >180 ms have an ↑ risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death; familial RBBB may be benign or, if it occurs in Kearns-Sayre syndrome or Brugada syndrome, potentially fatal Clinical Children with RBBB may have Hx of congenital heart disease, heart surgery–eg, VSD, palpitations, ↓ energy/activity/exercise tolerance, dizziness, syncope, familial Hx of arrhythmias–eg, BBB, complete heart block, pacemaker/defibrillator, premature or sudden unexplained death, acute MI under age 45; persistently split 2nd HS EKG Lead V1–late intrisicoid deflection, M-shaped QRS, wide R or occasionally qR; lead V6–early intinsicoid deflection, wide S; lead I–wide S Management Pacemaker, if syncope or significant arrhythmias Followup Telemetry prn; annual EKG. See Bundle branch block. Cf Left bundle branch block.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

right bundle branch block

Abbreviation: RBBB
A defect in the conductive system of the heart in which electrical conduction down the right bundle branch is delayed. On the 12-lead EKG, it gives the widened QRS complex an RSR appearance in leads V1 and V2.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
(*) p<0.05 was accepted statistically significant and marked bold CAD: coronary artery disease; LAH: left anterior hemi block; LPH: left posterior hemiblock; LBBB: left bundle branch block; RBBB: right bundle branch block. Table 2.
It was based on scores as in parenthesis: sinus tachycardia (2); incomplete right bundle branch block (2); complete right bundle branch block (3); T-wave inversion, graded by magnitude (V1 [0 to 2], V2 [1 to 3], V3 [1 to 3], V1 through V4 all inverted 2 mm [4]); S1Q3T3 complex components (S wave in lead I [0], Q wave in lead III [1], inverted T wave in lead III [1], and the entire S1Q3T3 complex [2]).
Incidence and prognostic significance of right bundle branch block in patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving thrombolytic therapy.
The resulting segments were divided into 18 different types of beats, namely, normal beat (NOR "N"), atrial premature contraction (APC "A"), fusion of ventricular and normal beat (FVN "F"), left bundle branch block (LBBB "L"), unclassifiable beat (UN "Q"), premature ventricular contraction (PVC "V"), right bundle branch block beat (RBBB "R"), ventricular flutter wave (VF "!"), atrial escape beat (AE "e"), fusion of paced and normal beat (FPN "f"), nodal (junctional) premature beat (NP "J"), isolated QRS-like artifact (-), aberrated atrial premature beat (AP "a"), ventricular escape beat (VE "E"), nodal (junctional) escape beat (NE "j"), nonconducted P-wave (blocked APB "x"), paced beat (PACE "/"), and supraventricular premature beat (SP "S").
The examination revealed the right bundle branch block with ST-T changes.
It is characterized by persistent or transient ST elevation with successive negative T wave in the right precordial leads (V1, V2) with or without right bundle branch block in the absence of structural heart abnormalities.
RVH in 61 (30.5%) cases (P = 0.005, r = 0.197), right atrial enlargement (RAE) was found in 52 (26%) patients (P = 0.006, r = 0.195), right bundle branch block in 20 (10%) cases (P = 0.01, r = 0.182), and poor progression of R wave in 24 (12%) cases (P = 0.046, r = 0.141).
These included the documentation of sustained VT of the morphology described in Table 1 (arrhythmia criteria), the presence of epsilon waves (depolarization criteria) and T-wave inversions in [V.sub.1], [V.sub.2], and [V.sub.3] in the absence of complete Right Bundle Branch Block (RBBB) (repolarization criteria).
Among the patients with bundle branch block, the right bundle branch block was the most frequently observed, followed by the left anterior branch block.
A less likely explanation is that the 2:1 AV block is above the bifurcation of the His bundle, e.g., in the AV node, in a patient who also has right bundle branch block. (1) Ventriculophasic sinus arrhythmia may occur with various forms of AV block, but is most typically seen with 2:1 AV block.
Other conduction abnormalities include right bundle branch block, sinus bradycardia, and prolonged QT interval.
(9) Sudden increases in right-sided pressure can lead to transient right bundle branch block, which may result in complete heart block in the setting of baseline left bundle branch block.