right axis deviation


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right ax·is de·vi·a·tion

a mean electrical axis of the heart pointing to the right of +90°. See: hexaxial reference system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Electrocardiogaphy (ECG) revealed right axis deviation and right bundle branch block along with atrial fibrillation and Transthoracic Echocardiography (TTE) showed abnormal valves (mitral stenosis with calcification and tricuspid regurgitation) and dilated cardiac chambers.
The EKG revealed a normal sinus rhythm, slight right axis deviation indicated by tall R-waves in V1 (also suggestive of right ventricular hypertrophy), an incomplete right bundle branch block, and a crochetage sign (a notch in the R-waves of the inferior leads).1 A chest x-ray (FIGURE 1) revealed a normalsized heart and dilated pulmonary vasculature suggestive of pulmonary hypertension.
Electrocardiogram (EKG) confirmed atrial fibrillation and right ventricle hypertrophy with right axis deviation. There were normal QRS voltage and complexes, T waves, and ST segments.
Right axis deviation was found in 30 (15%) cases (P = 0.073, r = 0.127), which had no significant correlation with COPD (Table 1).
DIAGNOSIS: Atrial flutter/fibrillation with a rapid (111 beats/ minutes) and variable ventricular response; right axis deviation of the QRS complex (+124[degrees]); a tall monophasic R wave in lead V1 that was taller than the R wave in V6 and was accompanied by a negative T wave; a tall R wave in lead aVR; and deep S waves in leads I, V5, V6.
ECG findings range from right axis deviation, QRS alterations, and T-wave inversions to ST-segment changes including ST-segment elevation, which can imitate acute myocardial infarction [1, 4, 7].
Among the ECG changes studied, premature atrial contraction (p = 0.008), right axis deviation (p < 0.001), indeterminate axis (p = 0.001), incomplete right bundle brunch block (p = 0.02), late R in aVR (p = 0.001), qR in V1 (p = 0.02), and P pulmonale (p = 0.03) were significantly more common in patients with PS than in those with major PE.
Electrocardiography (ECG) showed sinus rhythm with features of extreme right axis deviation with absent left ventricular forces in leads V4 to V6, (Fig.
Clinical assessment of patients with possible PAH includes an electrocardiogram, which may show changes in the right ventricle, including right axis deviation, right atrial enlargement, and right ventricular hypertrophy, Dr.
ECG showed right axis deviation but no right or left ventricular hypertrophy.
Clinical assessment of the patient with possible PAH includes an electrocardiogram, which may show changes in the right ventricle, including right axis deviation, right atrial enlargement, and right ventricular hypertrophy, said Dr.