ribozyme


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ri·bo·zyme

(rī'bō-zīm),
A nonprotein RNA biocatalyst; several cleave precursors of tRNA to yield functional tRNAs; others act on rRNA; plays a key role in intron splicing events.
Synonym(s): organic catalyst (1) , RNA enzyme
[ribonucleic acid + -zyme]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ribozyme

(rī′bə-zīm′)
n.
An RNA molecule that acts as a catalyst, especially for the cleavage of RNA strands at specific sites.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ribozyme

One of a unique class of RNA molecules that can act as cleaving enzymes in addition to storing genetic information. This is a notable exception to the general rule that all enzymes are proteins. Ribozymes form complementary base pairs in the normal manner but can cleave segments of nascent RNA during the splicing process of the formation of mature RNA transcripts of DNA. Ribozymes can be used in various ways as treatment modalities.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ribozyme

an RNA molecule with catalytic activity. Ribozymes include (a) molecules involved in processing RNA precursor molecules by cleaving PHOSPHODIESTER BONDS, for example in self-SPLICING of some precursor rRNA INTRONS; and (b) molecules catalysing key cellular reactions, for example rRNA of the large ribosomal subunit (see RIBOSOME), which is closely involved with the peptidyl transferase activity that catalyses PEPTIDE BOND formation in TRANSLATION. Ribozymes are found in EUCARYOTES, PROKARYOTES, VIRUSES and VIROIDS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The concentration of magnesium ions directly impacts the ribozyme's movements.
The HIV-1 NL43 genomic sequence was analyzed for the presence of potential hammerhead ribozyme target sites.
Inhibition of HPV-16 E6/E7 immortalization of normal keratinocytes by hairpin ribozymes. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998; 95 : 1189-94.
The problem is that success stories like Ribozyme have been too few.
Under your scenario, you can attach the ribozyme, make it a better catalyst, and then it can be de-attached to go and be recycled elsewhere.
Second, ribozymes acting on their own, without the help of proteins, are known to perform only a tiny set of simple reactions.
In contrast, achieving RNA interference using small interfering RNA is more efficient than Anti-sense oligos or ribozymes. Recent studies were demonstrated that using siRNA is more rational as these molecules can induce selective silencing of exogenous viral genes in mammalian cells, and the process does not interfere with the recovery of cellular regulatory systems previously inhibited by viral gene expression (61).
To continue, there are four types of self-cleaving motifs: the hammerhead, the hairpin, the vsRNA, and the hepatitis delta ribozyme. These four self-splicing introns catalyze reactions involving self-cleavage with a cyclic phosphate.
Joyce's specialty is the creation of ribozyme systems that replicate and even evolve somewhat--on the verge of life, but not quite there.
Creating a retroviral expression vector for delivery of ribozymes into eukaryotic cells.
We report a new class of highly efficient ribozymes generated by directed in vitro evolution that can catalyze the aminoacylation from aminoacetyl CoA.
Expression of ribozyme and antisense constructs targeted to the flax [Delta]9 desaturase.