ribosome


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ribosome

 [ri´bo-sōm]
any of the intracellular ribonucleoprotein organelles concerned with protein synthesis, found either bound to cell membranes or free in the cytoplasm. They may occur singly or in clusters (polyribosomes). The genetic code is translated when ribosomes attach to messenger RNA.

ri·bo·some

(rī'bō-sōm),
A granule of ribonucleoprotein, 120-200 Ǻ in diameter, that is the site of protein synthesis from aminoacyl-tRNAs as directed by mRNAs.
Synonym(s): Palade granule

ribosome

(rī′bə-sōm′)
n.
A structure composed of RNA and protein, present in large numbers in the cytoplasm of living cells and serving as the site for assembly of polypeptides encoded by messenger RNA.

ri′bo·so′mal (-sō′məl) adj.

ri·bo·some

(rī'bŏ-sōm)
A granule of ribonucleoprotein, 120-150 Å in diameter, which is the site of protein synthesis from aminoacyl-tRNAs as directed by mRNAs.

ribosome

A spherical cell ORGANELLE made of RNA and protein which is the site of protein synthesis in the cell by linking amino acids into chains. Ribosomes may be free or may be attached to the endoplasmic reticulum. During translation, ribosomes attach to MESSENGER RNA molecules and travel along them, synthesizing polypeptides as they go.

ribosome

a small particle (not an ORGANELLE) found in the cytoplasm of all cells, composed of protein and RIBOSOMAL RNA. Each ribosome is composed of two subunits of different sizes which sediment at different rates during centrifugation (see ULTRACENTRIFUGE). PROKARYOTES have ribosome with 70 S size and mass; EUKARYOTES have larger ribosomes with 80 S size and mass. Ribosomes bind to the 5′ end of MESSENGER RNA (see POLYNUCLEOTIDE CHAIN) and travel towards the 3′ end, with TRANSLATION and POLYPEPTIDE synthesis occurring as they go along. Frequently several ribosomes are attached to one piece of mRNA, forming a POLYRIBOSOME.

Palade,

George Emil, Romanian-U.S. cell biologist and Nobel laureate, 1912–.
Palade granule - a granule of ribonucleoprotein, the site of protein synthesis from aminoacyl-tRNAs as directed by mRNAs. Synonym(s): ribosome
Weibel-Palade bodies - see under Weibel
References in periodicals archive ?
The interactions could occur in the nucleus prior to splicing and in the cytoplasm aiding recruitment of the ribosome. Cytoplasmic translocation of PTB protein leads to increase in TRAF1, p53, and p47 mRNA expression.
Her colleagues thought there was nothing more to learn about the ribosome.
KAN acetylation inactivates the drug by preventing it from binding to the 30S ribosome. Promoter upregulating mutations in the 5' untranslated region of eis are associated with clinically relevant M.
Although surface receptors triggering cytokine induction are activated by some ribosomal inactivation, most primary responses originate from the ribosome and ER (Figure 1).
Signs labeled Ribosome, A Site, P Site, and E Site for each ribosome station.
The tenet declares that those instructions are carefully transcribed into multiple messenger RNA, or mRNA, copies, which are then read in three-letter chunks called codons by cellular machinery called ribosomes. Ribosomes then convert the mRNA instructions into proteins.
" In our case, the work relating to ribosome is finding applications within ten years after the discovery of its structure," the physicist- turned- biologist said, when asked about the practical utility of fundamental work in science.
This would have been such a severe setback to his work on ribosomes - protein factories inside cells - it would probably have denied him a Nobel prize.
The amount of time for a ribosome to traverse an mRNA transcript and make a completed peptide (i.e., ribosomal transit time) in the Antarctic sea urchin was measured at--1 [degrees]C.
She was awarded the prize for ribosome research, which is used to develop new antibiotics.