flavin mononucleotide

(redirected from riboflavin 5-phosphate)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

flavin

 [fla´vin]
any of a group of water-soluble yellow pigments widely distributed in animals and plants, including riboflavin and yellow enzymes.
flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) a coenzyme that is a condensation product of riboflavin phosphate and adenylic acid; it forms the prosthetic group (non–amino acid component) of certain enzymes, including d-amino acid oxidase and xanthine oxidase, and is important in electron transport in mitochondria.
flavin mononucleotide (FMN) a derivative of riboflavin consisting of a three-ring system (isoalloxazine) attached to an alcohol (ribitol); it acts as a coenzyme for a number of oxidative enzymes, including l-amino acid oxidase and cytochrome C reductase.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fla·vin mon·o·nu·cle·o·tide (FMN),

riboflavin 5'-phosphate; the coenzyme of a number of oxidation-reduction enzymes, for example, NADH dehydrogenase. Strictly speaking, FMN is not a nucleotide because it contains ribtol instead of ribose; the coenzyme is reversibly reduced to FMNH2.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flavin mononucleotide

n. Abbr. FMN
A derivative of riboflavin, C17H21N4O9P, that functions as a coenzyme of various flavoproteins in certain oxidation-reduction reactions in the body.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fla·vin mon·o·nu·cle·o·tide

(FMN) (flā'vin mon'ō-nū'klē-ō-tīd)
Riboflavin 5'-phosphate; the coenzyme of a number of oxidation-reduction enzymes; e.g., NADH dehydrogenase and l-amino acid oxidase. Strictly speaking, FMN is not a nucleotide because it contains a sugar alcohol instead of a sugar.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

flavin mononucleotide

see FMN.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005