rhyme

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rhyme

(rīm)
1. Correspondence in sound of the ends of words, e.g., smell, well, and foretell.
2. A poem in rhyme.
rhyme
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References in periodicals archive ?
Rhymers Ha' seemed to lose his confidence over fences earlier in the winter but he retains plenty of ability and this should be a confidence boost at one of his favoured tracks.
Rhymers Ha'' is clearly one of her sharper inmates from what we have seen so far, and must have a great shout in the Newcastle Falcons ''National Hunt'''' Novices'' Hurdle.
Rhymers Ha' is clearly one of her sharper inmates from what we have seen so far, and will be regarded as having a great shout in the Newcastle Falcons "National Hunt" Novices' Hurdle.
It also considers fiddle playing and dancing, the dance tunes, the Killyramer Christmas Rhymers and Mummers, and shinny playing and hurling.
25-37) the influence of his poetry on George Arthur Green, Arthur Symons, Ernest Rhys, and other members of the Rhymers' Club of the 1890s; the reception of two of the novels in 'Dal Piacere all' Enfant de Volupte e al Child of Pleasure: la censura londinese' (pp.
There are a lot of rhymers who are rhyming with a similar slippery cadence to me, and doing these rugged abstract beats, and they're seen as rappers.
IF THE Neptunes have got the production side of things on lock, then surely it's OutKast who are the most innovative and daring rhymers in the hip-hop business right now.
Clouddead themselves co-opt these rhymers into a four-keyboard line-up, with the lunacy levels multiplied as expected.
Rather than focus on the negative stereotypes that have dogged the rap genre, helmer Kevin Fitzgerald shows communities of gifted street rhymers who challenge and support one another in inspiring, creative ways.
Administrative skills that organized a Rhymers Club or spiritualist society would later guide the Irish theater through treacherous waters of political or religious censorship, as well as direct Yeats's shifting career from dreamy poet to political dramatist.
Henley's National Observer (13 December 1890), The Book of the Rhymers' Club (1892), the Religious Tract Society's Leisure Hour (August 1896), William and Elizabeth Sharp's anthology Lyra Celtica (1896), and Stopford Brooke and Rolleston's A Treasury of Irish Poetry in the English Tongue (1900), can one remain as confident in the relative stability of its meanings as Bornstein believes?
They are the members of the Rhymers' Club: they are the new voices of the old century.