rhyme

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Related to rhymed: rhymer, Nursery rhymes

rhyme

(rīm)
1. Correspondence in sound of the ends of words, e.g., smell, well, and foretell.
2. A poem in rhyme.
rhyme
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Russian, with multiple case endings and more elaborate conjugations than in English, to rhyme is comparatively easy phonetically but difficult literarily, because of the stringent expectations that the poet will not rhyme identical parts of speech (noun rhymed with noun, etc.) nor use any rhyme that might already be familiar.
Although there can be historical or conventional connections between a given poetic device and a given attitude--like the prevalent attitude today toward rhyme--I doubt there can be any innate connection, since every conceivable attitude has been expressed by poets in one place or another in every conceivable poetic mode, from the most conventionally rhymed sonnet that was nevertheless avant-garde in its poetic thinking, in how it made meaning, to the freest free verse that is scarcely more than one individual poet's repetition of cliches both linguistic and existential.
Anglo-Norman lyrics, which often mixed Latin, Anglo-Norman, and Middle English, and were usually rhymed, often internally, date from the twelfth century to the early fourteenth.
Unlike Old English verse, Anglo-Norman verse was based upon the prosodic principle of French and Latin verse of the period (that is, syllable counting), and both narrative verse in couplets and stanzaic lyrics were regularly rhymed. (19) (Anglo-Norman verse would have had an anglicized pronunciation: a key prosodic consideration.) Apart from the fourteenth-century alliterative revival, Middle English verse from the later thirteenth century onwards was regularly rhymed.
It has become a platitude of criticism to point out that verses composed of meaningless words afford no pleasure of any kind and can scarcely be called rhythmical - let them even be rhymed" (165).
This poem, like most rhymed poetry, rhymes with arithmetic regularity: four stressed words in a line, any of which may be alliterated; 12 end-rhymes to a stanza; and five-stanza groups united by a refrain and joined to other groups by link-words from that refrain.
Maguire focuses on the two subgenres of tragicomedy which developed in the 1660s, the divided tragicomedy and the rhymed heroic play.
Although Campion's English lyric poetry, for the most part, is rhymed, it is often classical in reference and inspiration, to a great extent rejecting the medieval tradition of courtly love in favor of sensuality and eroticism.
Diekhoff identifies seventeen rhymed couplets and, in a poem of over ten thousand lines, it is possible that an argument might be made for the occurrence of a certain number of rhymes on the grounds of probability alone.(3) If this were the only way in which the poem rhymed such an argument might be plausible, but when one begins to examine the sound patterning in Paradise Lost, a systematic use of rhyming sounds is apparent: a pattern emerges in which rhyme manifests itself in a variety of ways, occasionally erupting into proper couplets such as those above.