rhombencephalon


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rhombencephalon

 [rom″ben-sef´ah-lon]
1. the portion of the brain developed from the most caudal of the three primary brain vesicles of the early embryo, comprising the metencephalon and myelencephalon.
2. the most caudal of the three primary vesicles formed in embryonic development of the brain, which later divides into the metencephalon and the myelencephalon. Called also hindbrain.

rhom·ben·ceph·a·lon

(rom'ben-sef'ă-lon), [TA]
That part of the developing brain that is the most caudal of the three primary vesicles of the embryonic neural tube; secondarily divided into metencephalon and myelencephalon; the rhombencephalon includes the pons, cerebellum, and medulla oblongata.
Synonym(s): hindbrain [TA], hindbrain vesicle
[rhombo- + G. enkephalos, brain]

rhombencephalon

(rŏm′bĕn-sĕf′ə-lŏn′, -lən)
n.
The hindbrain.

rhom′ben·ce·phal′ic (-sə-făl′ĭk) adj.

rhomb·en·ceph·a·lon

(rom'ben-sef'ă-lon) [TA]
That part of the developing brain that is the most caudal of the three primary vesicles of the embryonic neural tube; secondarily divided into metencephalon and myelencephalon; the rhombencephalon includes the pons, cerebellum, and medulla oblongata.
Synonym(s): hindbrain.
[rhombo- + G. enkephalos, brain]
References in periodicals archive ?
By stage 21 the MLF had formed a tight bundle that projected along the floor plate into the rhombencephalon (Figure 1(g) and data not shown).
The third ventricle develops from the cavity in the midbrain (mesencephalon) and the fourth ventricle from the cavity in the hindbrain (rhombencephalon).
It is a structure of the metencephalon, and together with pons and the fourth ventricle, constructed a human rhombencephalon (Ellis, 2006; Fitzgerald et al., 2012).
Verzijl and coworker performed electrophysiological studies on 11 patients with mobius syndrome and concluded that Mobius syndrome is not a primary developmental disorder of the facial musculature but is a disorder of the rhombencephalon including both motor nuclei and transversing long tracts.
These studies suggest that the anteriormost elements of the neurocranium, the ethmoid plate and trabeculae, are derived from neural crest cells that migrate from the mesencephalon, whereas the more centrally located elements, orbitals and epiphyseal bar, receive neural crest contributions from both the mesencephalon and the preotic rhombencephalon (Langille and Hall, 1988).