rhizoid


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rhizoid

 [ri´zoid]
resembling a root.

rhi·zoid

(rī'zoyd),
1. Rootlike.
2. Irregularly branching, like a root; denoting a form of bacterial growth.
3. mycology the rootlike hyphae of fungi that arise at the nodes of the hyphae of Rhizopus species.
[rhizo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

rhizoid

(rī′zoid′)
n.
A slender rootlike filament that grows from an alga, a fungus, or the gametophyte of a moss, liverwort, or fern, used for attachment and nourishment.

rhi′zoid′, rhi·zoi′dal (-zoid′l) adj.

rhi·zoid

(rī'zoyd)
1. Rootlike.
2. Irregularly branching, like a root; denoting a form of bacterial growth.
3. In fungi, the rootlike hyphae that arise at the nodes of the hyphae of Rhizopus species.
[rhizo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

rhizoid

a hairlike structure that functions as a root in lower organisms such as certain fungi and mosses. Rhizoids are important in penetrating a substance, giving anchorage and absorbing nutrients.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
B: first stage of germination, with one rhizoid and a perpendicular first prothallial cell, 11 days.
Rhizoids unicellular, emerging proximally from pericentral cells, separated by the wall of the parent cell.
In both species, the basal cell second division produces a brownish rhizoid that emerges through the laesura, and forms the first initial filament cell (Fig.
But, in Chara rhizoids, the membrane-bound vesicles that are located close to the rhizoid apex appear to serve this function [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
The polarity-determination window is specified by a simple assay in which the spore position is changed by 180 [degrees] at various times after the initiation of germination by light, but before rhizoid emergence, and then the subsequent direction of rhizoid emergence and growth is recorded (Edwards and Roux, 1994).
On the agar, colonies were yellow-orange, flat, rather small and had irregular edges (rhizoid) but some colonies were more rhizoid than others and had different sizes and shapes, non-adherent to the agar (Figure 3), translucent, pale yellow due to flexirubin type pigments but the color was of different intensities on Anacker and Ordal agar as described by Bernardet and Grimont (1989).
vittata showed that spores germinated after eight days and they gave rise to a few cell filaments, and a rhizoid able to differentiate.
First division produces a rhizoid and a prothallial cell which cut perpendicularly (Fig.
Microscopic examination of young, actively growing moulds was on the basis of structures bearing spores and on the spores themselves; presence or absence of septation, rhizoid or other tissues.