rheotaxis

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rheotaxis

 [re″o-tak´sis]
orientation of an organism in a stream of liquid, with its long axis parallel with the direction of flow, designated negative (moving in the same direction) or positive (moving in the opposite direction).

rhe·o·tax·is

(rē'ō-tak'sis),
A form of positive barotaxis, in which a microorganism in a fluid is impelled to move against the current flow of its medium.
[rheo- + G. taxis, orderly arrangement]

rheotaxis

(rē′ə-tăk′sĭs)
n.
Movement of an organism in response to a current of water.

rhe′o·tac′tic (-tăk′tĭk) adj.

rhe·o·tax·is

(rē'ō-tak'sis)
A form of positive barotaxis in which a microorganism in a fluid is impelled to move against the current flow of its medium.
[rheo- + G. taxis, orderly arrangement]

rheotaxis

a movement (taxis) in response to a current, usually of water.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, we observed blue crabs using tactile search (e.g., leg probing and grasping) more often at slack tide when strong rheotactic cues were not available.
Sharks are also able to locate sources of odor, perhaps by using a combination of rheotactic (an oriented response with respect to the direction of water flow) and chemotactic mechanisms (Hodgson and Mathewson, 1971).
In no-flow experiments, odor delivery is unpredictable, although these do eliminate concerns about rheotactic behavior - starfish have been variously reported to move upstream (3) or cross-stream (4) [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE I OMITTED] when in flow with no odor.
Either the eels are using chemical cues to override the rheotactic cues temporarily; or they are using chemical cues to indicate which local currents (which may be oblique, perpendicular, or counter to the mean flow) to follow.