rhabdomyoma

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rhabdomyoma

 [rab″do-mi-o´mah]
a tumor containing striated muscle fibers.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

rhab·do·my·o·ma

(rab'dō-mī-ō'mă),
A benign neoplasm derived from striated muscle, occurring in the heart in children, probably as a hamartomatous process.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + -oma, tumor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

rhabdomyoma

(răb′dō-mī-ō′mə)
n. pl. rhabdomyo·mas or rhabdomyo·mata (-mə-tə)
A tumor in striated muscle fibers.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

rhab·do·my·o·ma

(rab'dō-mī-ō'mă)
A benign neoplasm derived from striated muscle, occurring in the heart in children, probably as a hamartomatous process.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + -oma, tumor]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

rhab·do·my·o·ma

(rab'dō-mī-ō'mă)
A benign neoplasm derived from striated muscle.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + -oma, tumor]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The diagnosis of cardiac rhabdomyoma in this study was based on the pathological and immunohistochemical findings.
At 6 months of age, echocardiography revealed a further decrease in rhabdomyoma size (13.8 x 12.1 mm); the lesion occupied a smaller portion (about 50%) of the mitral annulus (Figure 3(a)).
(a) Fibroma 1 (16.7%) Teratoma 1 (16.7%) Rhabdomyoma 4 (66.7%) (b) Teratoma 1 (9.1%) Rhabdomyoma 10 (90.9%) (c) Teratoma 40 (17.9%) Rhabdomyoma 120 (53.6%) Malignant tumor 2 (0.9%) Myxoma 6 (2.7%) Vascular tumor 13 (5.8%) Oncocytic cardiomyopathy 15 (6.7% Fibroma 28 (12.5%) Note: Table made from pie chart.
Left: Primitive round to oval spindled cells of an intermediate type fetal rhabdomyoma are shown.
When to suspect TSC: Some suggestive clinical signs and symptoms Family history * A family history of TSC may lead to comprehensive physical work-up and diagnosis of the disorder Antenatally * Cardiac rhabdomyoma on fetal ultrasound or fetal MRl * Cortical dysplasias such as cortical tubers or SENs on fetal ultrasound or fetal MRl First 5 years of life * Hypomelanotic macules (white patches) on the skin (distinct from vitiligo in that melanocytes are present in normal numbers in TSC hypomelanotic macules) (Fig.
In tuberous sclerosis, a cardiac rhabdomyoma is the only sign that can be detected prenatally.
Subependimal giant cell astrocytoma (SGCA) which develops in the brain, angiomyolipomas in the kidney and rhabdomyomas in the heart are the tumors which may lead to clinical symptoms.
Cardiac rhabdomyomas in tuberous sclerosis patients: a case report and review of the literature.
Major features of tuberous sclerosis include facial angiofibromas, cortical tubers, subependmal nodules, giant cell astrocytomas, cardiac rhabdomyomas, lymphagniomyomatosis, and renal angiomyolipomas.
Myofibroblastic and fibrohistiocytic tumors, pleomorphic sarcoma, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, rhabdomyomas and rhabdomyosarcomas, vascular tumors, tumors of synovial tissue, nerves, melanocytes, cartilage and osseous tissue, and other miscellaneous tumor types are covered, with most systemic categories divided into chapters on benign, intermediate, and malignant tumors.
Cerebral cortical abnormalities, subependymal tumors, convulsions, mental retardation, renal angiomyolipomas and cardiac rhabdomyomas may coexist with this syndrome.