rhabdomyolysis


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Related to rhabdomyolysis: exertional rhabdomyolysis

rhabdomyolysis

 [rab″do-mi-ol´ĭ-sis]
disintegration of striated muscle fibers with excretion of myoglobin in the urine. See also crush syndrome.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis

(rab'dō-mī-ol'i-sis), Avoid the mispronunciation rhabdomyoly'sis.
An acute, fulminating, potentially fatal disease of skeletal muscle that entails destruction of muscle, as evidenced by myoglobinemia and myoglobinuria.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + lysis, loosening]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

rhabdomyolysis

Skeletal muscle destruction, with release of myoglobin in blood and urine Etiology Severe exertion–eg, marathons, calisthenics, muscle necrosis due to arterial occlusion, DVT, seizures, drug overdose–amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, PCP, trauma, shaking chills, heatstroke, alcohol–delirium tremens. See Crush injury, Exertional rhabdomyolysis, Myoglobinuria.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rhab·do·my·ol·y·sis

(rab'dō-mī-ol'i-sis)
An acute, fulminating, potentially fatal disease of skeletal muscle that entails destruction of muscle as evidenced by myoglobinemia and myoglobinuria.
[rhabdo- + G. mys, muscle, + lysis, loosening]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

rhabdomyolysis

Breakdown of muscle with release of MYOGLOBIN. This is usually the result of a severe crushing injury but may occur in severe and persistent exertion; dopaminergic blockade or withdrawal of dopaminic agents; low potassium, sodium or phosphate levels; the use of statin drugs; or following a virus infection of muscle. The condition causes weakness or temporary paralysis but full recovery is usual except in cases of severe injury. The condition may occur in MCARDLE'S DISEASE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Antipsychotic use and the risk of rhabdomyolysis. J Pharm Pract.
CPK was 39863 IU/L and Phosphate 7.8 mg/dl suggesting acute kidney injury and rhabdomyolysis.
Rhabdomyolysis (RML) can cause serious electrolyte imbalances such as hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypocalcemia, as well as metabolic derangements such as hyperuricemia and metabolic acidosis.
Rhabdomyolysis is a commonly understood risk associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
After the preliminary assessment, it was found that rhabdomyolysis was caused by an infectious disease and complicated with multiple organ failure and with possible sepsis.
High doses of INH may lead to metabolic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, convulsions, lactic acidosis, coma, and eventually death (1).
Early diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis and proper treatment can lead to successful recovery.
Features of low potassium include generalised weakness and lethargy, ascending paralysis, and rhabdomyolysis. [15] [17] Decreased intake is rarely a cause of low potassium as the western diet usually contains significantly more potassium than is needed and because the renal tubular reabsorption mechanism can be extremely effective in limiting potassium excretion.
Compartment syndrome (CS) is defined as impaired perfusion of tissue capillaries due to increased perfusion pressure in muscle fascias of the extremities and can lead to rhabdomyolysis (1).
Creatine kinase can't be ignored, either, especially in young, athletic patients, because of the risk of rhabdomyolysis.
The spectra of hair dye toxicity is wide, however, it presents more commonly with severe angioedema of face and neck leading to respiratory failure, rhabdomyolysis complicating into acute kidney injury, myocarditis and acute liver injury.