rhabdom

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rhabdom

(răb′dəm, -dŏm′)
n.
A rodlike structure in the center of each ommatidium in the compound eye of an arthropod, composed of microvilli extending from the surrounding retinular cells.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

rhabdom

or

rhabdome

a transparent rod that passes down the centre of an insect or crustacean ommatidium. see EYE, COMPOUND.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Most Photoreceptors in Limulus Eyes Express Multiple Opsins (Table 1) That Change Their Relative Concentrations in Rhabdoms with a Diurnal Rhythm
LpOps 1-4 and LpOps5 coexpression in rhabdoms in LE retinular cells and giant VE photoreceptors was confirmed with immunocytochemical assays.
An additional synapomorphy for Leptopodomorpha is the shape of the rhabdom resembling a "5" pattern on a dice (Fischer et al.
The rhabdom structure in the ommatidia of the Heteroptera (Insecta), and its phylogenetic significance.
Of course, there are many additional questions that remain unanswered in spiders, ranging from the evolutionary basis of variation in field of view to the developmental control of rhabdom size and shape.
rhabdoms, basement membrane of the ommatidia, and optic nerve fibers anterior to the lamina ganglionaris.
Behavior of rhodopsin and metarhodopsin in isolated rhabdoms of crabs and lobsters.
Rhabdoms of Type II ommatidia thus operate as a series of spectral filters, each of which affects all receptors beneath.
For most superposition compound eyes, the tapetum should, ideally, be formed of reflecting pigment enclosing the proximal third of each rhabdom. This has the effect of doubling the path length of light (by reflecting unabsorbed photons back through the target rhabdom) and restricting the bleed of light between adjacent rhabdoms.
A tapetum formed of reflecting pigment cells (creamy white in life) lies beneath the rhabdom layer, and the tapetal cells surround the bases of the rhabdoms [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURES 4A, B OMITTED].
The rhabdoms in Paralomis are extraordinarily well developed and occupy up to 85% of the available cytoplasmic space in the distal and central regions of the retinula [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 4 OMITTED].
These interdigitations may be regarded as forming a poorly developed closed rhabdom. Finally we found a region with distinct, but irregularly arranged microvilli forming a rather disordered, open rhabdom.