revulsion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

revulsion

 [re-vul´shun]
the drawing of blood from one part to another, as occurs in counterirritation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

der·i·va·tion

(der'i-vā'shŭn),
1. The source or process of an evolution. Synonym(s): revulsion
2. The drawing of blood or body fluids to one part to relieve congestion in another.
[L. derivatio, fr. derivo, pp. -atus, to draw off, fr. rivus, a stream]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

revulsion

(rĭ-vŭl′shən)
n.
Medicine The reduction of superficial inflammation in an affected body part, as by topical agents, in order to decrease inflammation in adjacent structures.

re·vul′sive adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

count·er·ir·ri·ta·tion

(kown'tĕr-ir-i-tā'shŭn)
Irritation or mild inflammation (redness, vesication, or pustulation) of the skin excited for the purpose of relieving symptoms of an inflammation of the deeper structures.
Synonym(s): revulsion (1) .

der·i·va·tion

(der'i-vā'shŭn)
The source, origin, or evolutionary course of a structure or process.
Synonym(s): revulsion (2) .
[L. derivatio, fr. derivo, pp. -atus, to draw off, fr. rivus, a stream]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Where's our revulsion at the hideous birth defects among Iraqi babies deformed by our saturation of their air, water and soil with depleted uranium, surpassing post-World War II rates in Hiroshima and Nagasaki?
Revulsion that those who have seized the BBC journalist could be cruel enough to subject their prisoner, his family, friends and colleagues to such distress.
Most likely it will unite us in revulsion or boredom.
The reader gets a heavy dose of Olson's devotion to Flacius and revulsion of Melanchthon, leading this reviewer to wonder whether Olson tends toward presenting a hagiography rather than a biography.
Despite the revulsion Harry feels for Voldemort, Harry must investigate memories tied to his most deadly enemy, in the hope of learning all he can.
All civilised people, Muslim or other, feel revulsion at it.
The warning was enough to force a price shift though, and public revulsion may see Maxwell backed to be evicted.
In a suite of recent bronze sculptures exhibited at Mary Boone Gallery--a selection from a series first seen at Dublin's Irish Museum of Modern Art last summer--Quinn has fine-tuned the balance of pathos and revulsion to which his career has thus far been dedicated.
The revulsion that she felt when she stood before Baartman's remains at the museum grew deeper as she read of Baartman's ignoble treatment--both in life and after death.
The revulsion of some to the statement that there is absolute truth is a revulsion to any standards of conduct that can be enforced.
Lewis's description of this is as short as it is fascinating: but it is graphic, and one can well understand Lewis's revulsion and his avoidance of "such spectacles" ever after.