revulsion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

revulsion

 [re-vul´shun]
the drawing of blood from one part to another, as occurs in counterirritation.

der·i·va·tion

(der'i-vā'shŭn),
1. The source or process of an evolution. Synonym(s): revulsion
2. The drawing of blood or body fluids to one part to relieve congestion in another.
[L. derivatio, fr. derivo, pp. -atus, to draw off, fr. rivus, a stream]

revulsion

(rĭ-vŭl′shən)
n.
Medicine The reduction of superficial inflammation in an affected body part, as by topical agents, in order to decrease inflammation in adjacent structures.

re·vul′sive adj.

count·er·ir·ri·ta·tion

(kown'tĕr-ir-i-tā'shŭn)
Irritation or mild inflammation (redness, vesication, or pustulation) of the skin excited for the purpose of relieving symptoms of an inflammation of the deeper structures.
Synonym(s): revulsion (1) .

der·i·va·tion

(der'i-vā'shŭn)
The source, origin, or evolutionary course of a structure or process.
Synonym(s): revulsion (2) .
[L. derivatio, fr. derivo, pp. -atus, to draw off, fr. rivus, a stream]

revulsion

the drawing of blood from one part to another, as in counterirritation; the diminution of morbid action in any part of the body by irritation in another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where's our revulsion at hundreds of Palestinians dismembered and incinerated by Israel with U.
Revulsion that those who have seized the BBC journalist could be cruel enough to subject their prisoner, his family, friends and colleagues to such distress.
All civilised people, Muslim or other, feel revulsion at it.
The warning was enough to force a price shift though, and public revulsion may see Maxwell backed to be evicted.
In a suite of recent bronze sculptures exhibited at Mary Boone Gallery--a selection from a series first seen at Dublin's Irish Museum of Modern Art last summer--Quinn has fine-tuned the balance of pathos and revulsion to which his career has thus far been dedicated.
Lewis's description of this is as short as it is fascinating: but it is graphic, and one can well understand Lewis's revulsion and his avoidance of "such spectacles" ever after.
Or had they learned to bury any instinctive twinges of conscience or revulsion in this matter under a suffocating hillock of diplomas and degrees in feminist history, sexual politics, and queer theory?
Huntington views this movement of peoples and co-mingling of culture with dread and not a little Aryan revulsion.
SIR: Why the revulsion and snide remarks against the Future Systems' Selfridges store in Outrage (AR October) but praise for the Kunsthaus in Graz by Peter Cook and Colin Fournier (AR December)?
For example, the dead goblin stirs revulsion although all we see is a hairy tail sticking out from the edge of the page.
Among the comments Charen finds objectionable is this one by Norman Mailer: "Americans should reflect on and try to understand why so many people feel a revulsion toward the U.