revivification

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Related to revivifications: revivified

re·viv·i·fi·ca·tion

(rē-viv'i-fi-kā'shŭn),
1. Renewal of life and strength. Synonym(s): revivescence
2. Refreshening the edges of a wound by paring or scraping to promote healing. Synonym(s): vivification
[L. re-, again, + vivo, to live, + facio, to make]

re·viv·i·fi·ca·tion

(rē-viv'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. Renewal of life and strength.
2. Refreshening the edges of a wound by paring or scraping to promote healing.
Synonym(s): vivification.
[L. re-, again, + vivo, to live, + facio, to make]

revivification

(rē-vĭv″ĭ-fĭ-kā′shŭn) [L. re, again, + vivere, to live, + facere, to make]
1. An attempt to restore life to those apparently dead; restoration to life or consciousness; also the restoration of life in local parts, as a limb after freezing.
2. The pairing of surfaces to facilitate healing, as in a wound.

re·viv·i·fi·ca·tion

(rē-viv'i-fi-kā'shŭn)
Refreshening edges of a wound by paring or scraping to promote healing.
[L. re-, again, + vivo, to live, + facio, to make]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Retention of the afterbirth after parturition was believed by early modern medicine to be most grievous, and postparturition pollution was a leading cause of hysterical suffocation, so while I would leave open the possibility that Shakespeare represents a real revivification scenario in Hermione's collapse and tardy revival, I think another contrivance more compelling: we are meant to perceive that Hermione revives offstage prior to the sixteen-year mark, because Paulina's foreknowledge that Hermione will indeed come back to "life" in the staging of the statue scene is what constitutes the wit behind Paulina's rejoinders and mocking protestations.
In Pericles, we might see the culmination of the revivified hysteric myth in Shakespearean drama: Thaisa's revivification by Cerimon is the central event given to her character, and the illness provides the only rationale for the doctor's appearance, a common plot element of plays presenting female characters suffering from hysterical indispositions generally, such as in The Two Noble Kinsmen, which I have addressed elsewhere.
Thaisa's recovery next in the pagan temple of Diana indicates that hysterical disorders require rites of purification (regardless of whether the revivification be treated parodically or genuinely) before the patient can be reincorporated into her role in the family structure, as Hermione's sixteen-year absence also declares.
Before one can see Desdemona's and the Duchess's portrayals in a fuller context, I would argue that one need be attuned to the cultural emphasis of pathological conditionhood given to female sexuality in the period and to the imagery of hysterical suffocation (or strangulation of the womb) unmistakably underscoring the two plays' revivification motifs.