saucerization

(redirected from revivication)

saucerization

 [saw″ser-ĭ-za´shun]
1. the excavation of tissue to form a shallow shelving depression, usually performed to facilitate drainage from infected areas of bone.
2. the shallow saucer-like depression on the upper surface of a vertebra that has suffered a compression fracture.

sau·cer·i·za·tion

(saw'sĕr-i-zā'shŭn),
Excavation of tissue to form a shallow depression, performed in wound treatment to facilitate drainage from infected areas.
Synonym(s): craterization

saucerization

Orthopedics A flattened, disciform defect that parallels the shaft of long bones, which may be seen on a plain film, punctuated by microcalcifications; saucerized bone defects are typical of fibrosarcoma of bone Surgery Saucerization biopsy, see there.

sau·cer·i·za·tion

(saw'sĕr-ī-zā'shŭn)
Excavation of tissue to form a shallow depression, performed in wound treatment to facilitate drainage from infected areas.

sau·cer·i·za·tion

(saw'sĕr-ī-zā'shŭn)
Excavation of tissue to form a shallow depression, performed in wound treatment to facilitate drainage from infected areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were associated with funerary rites, their key symbolism being cosmological mediation and movement, and representing both death and revivication. (26) In pre-Christian Baltic religion, grass snakes represented a family's forebears after their passing away.
The cinema is attributed something of the uncanny, as it is aligned with an unnatural revivication of the lost past.
Likewise, The Matrix's and the entire trilogy's radical subnarratives may highlight the problematic nature of Neo's and the AI's power, but neither Hollywood nor its revivication (or vivisection) of cyberpunk want to allow these politicized narratives to break through their own encoding.
The generalist will profit most from the articles that are either synthetic in nature or that place the specific findings within a broad historical context; notable in this respect are Thomas Worcester's synopsis and critique of the work of Jean Delameau, Franco Mormando's study of how Bernardino of Siena answered the question, "what happens to us when we die?," Martha Rampton's investigation of the subject of revivication in theological discourse, Edelgard DuBruck's survey of the late-medieval poetry on death, and Donald Duclow's study of the "good death" in the Ars moriendi and in artistic portrayals of the death of the Virgin Mary.
This revivication technique was the most successful known treatment at the time.
In accordance with what seems a directly Freudian understanding of the fundamental ambivalence underlying the cult of revivication, Margaret's marriage brings about the renewal of the death wish that accompanies the community's ironic reenactment of the fertility ceremony.