reverse transcriptase inhibitors


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Related to reverse transcriptase inhibitors: Protease inhibitors

reverse transcriptase inhibitors

A range of drugs that interfere with the process by which retroviruses, such as HIV, convert their RNA genomes into duplex DNA which can then be incorporated into the DNA of the attacked cell. By delaying this process the progress of a retroviral infection can be slowed. Brand names are lamivudine, stavudine, zalcitabine and zidovudine.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are no clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions between nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and rifampicin-based TB treatment.
In particular, the recent use of the nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors abacavir and didanosine has been associated with myocardial infarction in the large DAD study cohort [1].
They recorded the incidence of myocardial infarction during the follow-up period and looked at the associations between myocardial infarction and exposure to protease inhibitors or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.
nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), gp120 inhibitors, protease inhibitors, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors.
Reverset is a nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor that is being developed as a once-daily oral HIV therapy by Incyte Corporation and Pharmasset, Inc.
Even though other studies showed that elevations in triglyceride and cholesterol and body shape changes were also seen with the other classes of drugs and not just the protease inhibitors, the field had moved to using a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based regimen as part of first-line therapy.
Nucleoside/Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (nukes): These medications interfere with viral reverse transcriptase by acting as "fake building blocks" that disrupt the creation of proviral DNA needed to take over the infected cell to build new viruses (see #2 in diagram).
Roles of conformational and positional adaptability in structure-based design of TMC125-R165335 (etravirine) and related non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors that are highly potent and effective against wild type and drug-resistant HIV variants.
The randomized study of 122 patients with HIV added a protease inhibitor to a standard regimen of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor for 62 patients who continued the induction regimen for 24-32 weeks in order to lower viral load to less than 50 copies/mL.
67 for high ALT), and the same was true among those on multiple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (OR of 1.
Reverse transcriptase inhibitors copy the genetic code of HIV and helps it replicate into additional human cells.
These drugs are other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as lamivudine, and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors such as nevirapine, and protease inhibitors such as indinavir and ritonavir.

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