reverse pupillary block

reverse pupillary block

increased resistance to flow of aqueous humor through the pupil from the anterior chamber to the posterior chamber, leading to posterior bowing of the peripheral iris against the zonules; a possible mechanism for pigmentary glaucoma.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

re·verse pu·pil·lar·y block

(rē-vĕrs' pyū'pi-lar-ē blok)
Increased resistance to flow of aqueous humor through the pupil from the anterior chamber to the posterior chamber, leading to posterior bowing of the peripheral iris against the zonules; a possible mechanism for pigmentary glaucoma.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) The iris in these eyes can start to bow posteriorly and chafe against the lens zonules--a situation known as 'reverse pupillary block.' This rubbing can then lead to the release of pigment from the iris into the anterior chamber, giving rise to a classic triad of clinical signs.
Intraoperative use of a flexible iris retractor could be an option to relieve the reverse pupillary block. By doing this, the iris can be lifted continuously from the anterior capsule rim and held securely from the wound and phacoemulsification probe to minimize the chance of iris prolapsed and damage [22].
Gradual pigmentation on the TM may lead to increased aqueous humor outflow resistance, resultant elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), and glaucomatous neuropathy.[sup][7],[12],[18] TM pigmentation has been widely accepted as the cause of PG, which is resultant from PDS.[sup][21],[22],[23],[24],[25] As secondary open-angle glaucoma, PG has much in common with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in clinical manifestations and treatment principle except for laser iridoctomy to eliminate the reverse pupillary block. Trabeculectomy is commonly applied in advanced PG patients when laser treatment and/or antiglaucoma medication fail to arrest the high IOP.
In the contralateral eyes of the enrolled patients, either trabeculectomy or laser peripheral iridoctomy was performed to eliminate reverse pupillary block, and the iris recovered to flat or regular.
The iridectomy breaks down the reverse pupillary block by communicating the AC and PC, after which the iris returns to be flat or regular and departs from the anterior surface of the crystalline lens and zonules, preventing more pigment granules to liberate from the IPE layer of the iris.