revaccination

(redirected from revaccinations)
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re·vac·ci·na·tion

(rē'vak-si-nā'shŭn),
Vaccination of an individual previously successfully vaccinated.

revaccination

(rē″văk-sĭ-nā′shŭn)
An inoculation against a disease to sustain a passive immune response (protective antibodies) against a potentially infectious organism.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Revaccination. ACIP recommendations for revaccination remain unchanged from the 1997 recommendations (2).
* ACIP does not recommend routine revaccination for most persons for whom PPSV23 is indicated.
Annual influenza revaccination reduces all-cause mortality in community-dwelling elderly persons, a study suggests.
Revaccination in the next year reduced mortality by 24%.
Annual revaccination increases vaccine efficacy for reducing mortality risk in this population, they concluded.
The level of antibody that protects against smallpox (variola) infection is not known, but epidemiologic studies suggest that protection against smallpox persists a minimum of 5 years after revaccination [12].
Afte revaccination, 35% of children develop temperatures of [is greater than or equal to] 100 F, and 5% have temperatures of [is greater than or equal to] 102 F [13].
Inadvertent inoculation at other sites is the most frequent complication of vaccinia vaccination, accounting for about half of all complications of primary vaccination and revaccination (Table 1).
For a person in a population of 280 million who is considering preexposure revaccination with a risk for serious vaccine-related adverse events of 1 in 1,000,000, even at a 1 in 10 risk for smallpox attack, the net risk is <0, and the decision criteria would indicate not accepting revaccination (scenario assumed 1,000 smallpox cases before discovery of the attack, and setting [P.sub.Valuation] = 1:1).
The persistence of neutralizing antibodies after revaccination against smallpox.