reuptake


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

reuptake

 [re-up´tāk]
reabsorption of a previously secreted substance.

reuptake

(rē-ŭp′tāk′)
n.
The reabsorption of a neurotransmitter, such as serotonin or norepinephrine, by a neuron following impulse transmission across a synapse.
References in periodicals archive ?
CHICAGO -- A preliminary analysis of hospital admissions suggests that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be associated with a significant risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, Michael Jones, M.D., said at the annual Digestive Disease Week.
In contrast, the use of SSRIs or selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors was not associated with an increased rate of metabolic syndrome or any of its components.
Other recently approved first-time genetic drugs include escitalopram tablets, the genetic version of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Lexapro, and sertraline in tablet and oral concentrate formulations, the generic version of the SSRI Zoloft.
Anything that affects serotonin levels works, she said, including venlafaxine (Effexor), a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.
Venlafaxine is a dual inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake. Many physicians who prescribe it consider it a more effective antidepressant than the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).
The participants in the study, which was supported by Pfizer Inc., reported persistent sexual dysfunction and had been taking selective or nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for a mean of 27 months (JAMA 2008;300:395-404).
But decisions about continuing treatment with other SSRIs and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors may be more complicated.
The newest generation of antidepressants gives physicians some novel options for treating depression that go a step beyond the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), but like the SSRIs the new antidepressants are not effective in about 40% of patients with major depression.
Physicians prescribe these drugs, called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), with considerable success against depression, but their effectiveness against severe PMS has been less clear.
Antidepressants that block action on the serotonin reuptake mechanism appear to raise the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding to the same degree that antiplatelet drugs do, a new report shows.
For example, the document proposes to eliminate the distinction between NSAIDs and cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors and between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.
A number of treatments are available for women with postpartum depressive disorder, including tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and hormone therapy.