reuptake


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reuptake

 [re-up´tāk]
reabsorption of a previously secreted substance.

reuptake

/re·up·take/ (re-up´tāk) reabsorption of a previously secreted substance.

reuptake

(rē-ŭp′tāk′)
n.
The reabsorption of a neurotransmitter, such as serotonin or norepinephrine, by a neuron following impulse transmission across a synapse.

reuptake

[re·up′tāk]
reabsorption of a previously secreted substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a meta-analysis of 31 studies with 10,130 patients, researchers reported that the total rate of sexual dysfunction (SD) associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) was significantly higher than the placebo rate of 14.
Pregnancy outcomes following exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a meta-analysis of clinical trials.
They found that those who had taken selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were more than twice as likely to have a child later diagnosed with ASD.
Table Risk factors for gastrointestinal bleeding Medications Corticosteroids, anticoagulants (warfarin), antiplatelets (clopidogrel), NSAIDs (including aspirin), calcium channel blockers, SSRIs, SNRIs, tricyclic antidepressants Disease Age (elderly are state/patient at higher risk), factors history of ulcer, chronic alcohol use, peptic ulcer disease, esophageal varices, gastric or colorectal cancer, gastritis, liver disease, coagulopathy NSAIDs: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; SNRIs: serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors; SSRIs: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors Source: References 2-5
Antidepressants vary in the degree to which they prevent the reuptake of serotonin.
The most common drug combinations associated with serotonin syndrome involve the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MA01s), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (9).
Effective therapies included antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors, such as paroxetine (Paxil), venlafaxine (Effexor), fluoxetine (Prozac), and citalopram (Celexa) and the antiseizure drug gabapentin (Neurontin).
It is one of a class of drugs known as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors.
Fluvoxamine maleate is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which was originally developed in Switzerland in 1983 and has been marketed in Japan since 1999.
Paxil, a type of serotonin reuptake inhibitor or SRI, fails to work in half of all patients with OCD and one-third of patients suffering from major depression.
Although it isn't possible to guess how many runners use selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)--the very commonly prescribed class of effective antidepressant medications that includes Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, Celexa, and others--it's a safe bet that there are many since nationwide their use is so common.