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return

 [re-tern´]
a coming back.
venous return the flow of blood into the heart from the peripheral vessels.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

return

(rē-tŭrn'),
1. Going or coming back; in cardiology, refers to blood flow.
2. In phlebotomy, the appearance of blood in the hub of the venipuncture apparatus.
[M.E., fr. L.L. retorno, , to turn again]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
'So resolved am I to hold this course,' returned the other, tasting his wine with great deliberation; 'that I have determined not to quarrel with you, and not to be betrayed into a warm expression or a hasty word.'
'I will stand,' returned Mr Haredale impatiently, 'on this dismantled, beggared hearth, and not pollute it, fallen as it is, with mockeries.
'I should say,' he returned, sipping his wine, 'there could be no doubt about it.
'Haredale,' returned the other, rocking himself to and fro as in assent, and nodding at the fire, 'it's extremely manly, and really very generous in you, to meet me in this unreserved and handsome way.
'Oh,' returned Tom, with contemptuous patronage, 'she's a regular girl.
'Not so much of that as you may suppose,' returned Tom; 'for our governor had her crammed with all sorts of dry bones and sawdust.
"We are men of his company and we have news for him," returned the speaker in the sampan.
The native on shore returned to the long-house without replying.
'I won't go so far as to say everything,' returned Mr Boffin, on whom his manner seemed to grate, 'because there's some things that I never found among the dust.
'But let me represent to you,' returned Lightwood, 'speaking now with professional profundity, and not with individual imbecility, that the offer of such an immense reward is a temptation to forced suspicion, forced construction of circumstances, strained accusation, a whole tool-box of edged tools.'
'Your lawyer, Mr Boffin,' returned Lightwood, making a very short note of it with a very rusty pen, 'has the gratification of taking the instruction.
'I beg your pardon,' returned Eugene, with a reluctant smile, 'but will you excuse my mentioning that I always protest against being referred to the bees?'