retroposed

retroposed

 [ret″ro-pōzd´]
displaced backward.

ret·ro·posed

(ret'rō-pōzd),
Denoting retroposition.
[retro- + L. pono, pp. positus, to place]

ret·ro·posed

(ret'rō-pōzd)
Denoting retroposition.
[retro- + L. pono, pp. positus, to place]
References in periodicals archive ?
Kaessmann, "Evolutionary fate of retroposed gene copies in the human genome," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
Although most retroposition events result in non-functional duplicates (called pseudogenes), in rare cases, retroposed genes, like Rps23r1, can become functional.
Kim, "Rapid Evolution of a Recently Retroposed Transcription Factor YY2 in Mammalian Genomes," Genomics 87 (2006): 348-55; J.
Another type of genetic analysis involves the use of retroposed genetic elements (retroposons; reviewed in Deininger and Batzer 1993).