retroperitoneal sarcoma

retroperitoneal sarcoma

A nonspecific term for any sarcoma arising in the retroperitoneal region, which comprises 15% of all sarcomas (of 8,600 cases/year, USA).
 
Clinical findings
Often asymptomatic abdominal mass; average age, 50.

Prognosis
65% to 80% of cases achieve complete resection; 5-year local recurrence, ±50%; 5-year survival, ±50%.

Histological types of retroperitoneal sarcoma
• Liposarcoma—41%;
• Leiomyosarcoma—28%;
• Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)—7%;
• Fibrosarcoma—6% (MFH and fibrosarcoma are now viewed as synonyms);
• Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour—3%.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Leiomyosarcoma was also presented as large heterogeneous soft tissue mass lesion with areas of necrosis in 54 years old without any evidence of calcification or fat density within which we diagnosed as only case of retroperitoneal sarcoma as the leiomyosarcoma.
Theoretically, the best option for retroperitoneal sarcoma is complete resection plus adjuvant therapy.
In patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 48.
1 We present a case of huge mesenteric liposarcoma which was mistakenly labelled as a case of retroperitoneal sarcoma and the patient was being denied surgery for fear of irresectability due to its very large size.
Giant retroperitoneal sarcoma: a case report and review of the management of retroperitoneal sarcomas.
Other topics include the management of the axilla and retroperitoneal sarcoma, the role of radiotherapy in breast cancer, and a review of recent randomized trials.
An en bloc resection of the left colon, retroperitoneal sarcoma, left kidney and adrenal gland with end colostomy were completed.
The role of neoadjuvant therapy is important in cases of retroperitoneal sarcoma, (8) but rarely RCC.
DISCUSSION: Retroperitoneal liposarcoma is the most common histological subtype of retroperitoneal sarcoma accounting for around 40% and mostly occurs in middle age group (5th decade onward).
Retroperitoneal haemorrhage, primary retroperitoneal sarcoma, metastatic deposits to the retro peritoneum and retroperitoneal amyloidosis may show similar findings on CT scans.
The differential diagnoses include Wilm's tumour, neuroblastoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC), malignant lymphoma, metastatic renal involvement from sarcoma elsewhere in the body, and renal involvement by a primary retroperitoneal sarcoma.
The role of radiation and chemotherapy in the management of retroperitoneal sarcoma remains controversial.

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