retrojection


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ret·ro·jec·tion

(ret'rō-jek'shŭn),
The washing out of a cavity by the backward flow of an injected fluid.
[L. retro, backward, + jacio, to throw]

ret·ro·jec·tion

(ret'rō-jek'shŭn)
The washing out of a cavity by the backward flow of an injected fluid.
[L. retro, backward, + jacio, to throw]

retrojection

(rĕt″rō-jĕk′shŭn) [″ + jacio, throw]
Washing out a cavity from within by injection of a fluid.
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References in periodicals archive ?
All our liturgical texts come from centuries later, and it is only by force of conjecture and retrojection that we make them speak for the first centuries of the common era.
Richard Fardon, in the first essay, "The Person, Ethnicity and the Problem of Identity in West Africa," confirms the view that the identity of the Chamba seems to be a product of the retrojection of the tribe's collective memory into a comprehensive historical narrative in which they could not have participated.
The play is an overt metaphor for the circumstances of actual conflict, and the fanciful retrojection of its origin to that golden age of the personal duel, the Trojan War, was expressive.
Rather he reduces his precursors to client status by the retrojection of his own philosophy onto Moses; and, bringing them into harmony with Scripture, he employs this as his canon of antiquity and truth (pp.
(31) Yet it should also be recognized that this social charter was probably invoked to protect the status quo for a privileged group and that its image of a changeless political order, legitimated by events in the past, is likely to be a retrojection of the situation at the time of composition.
(78) With regard to human origins, the de novo creation of Adam is an ancient origins science based on the retrojection of an ancient phenomenological perspective of taxonomy.
That historiographic lapse is a retrojection of a post-Chalcedonian expression onto a pre-Chalcedonian conversation.
(3) To interpret the kinds of ancestral statements presented by the arche-fossil, the correlationist irremediably commits a twofold retrojection and doubling of their meaning: the correlationist will first retroject the conditions active for a subject now onto an ancestral past such that any conceivable event--past, present, or future--must conform to the modes of subjective representation; and second, the correlationist interprets the content of an ancestral statement as objectively true (yes, the evidence indicates that y event happened x years ago) with the addition of a formal 'codicil', that the ancestral statement is true only 'for humans' (AF 13/30).
(21) In temporal terms, this figuration is thus both a projection and a retrojection, a fact that Ambrose makes clear at De mysteriis 4.24-25.
The former engages in retrojection, reading the contemporary feminist anger and combativeness into the ancient texts and seeing conspiratorial, and often misogynistic, purposes in any given text dealing with women or referring to matters of gender.
In particular, the notion of creating plants and animals "after their/its kinds" in Genesis 1 reflects the retrojection of an ancient phenomenological perspective of living organisms.
He is undoubtedly correct that the figure of the Antichrist derives from the combat myths that were ubiquitous in the Mediterranean world and the Near East, but his retrojection of the term Antichrist into the pre-Christian period blurs some significant distinctions.