retrograde

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Related to retrograde transport: Axoplasmic flow, anterograde transport

retrograde

 [ret´ro-grād]
1. moving backward or against the usual direction of flow.
2. degenerating, deteriorating, or catabolic.

ret·ro·grade

(ret'rō-grād),
1. Moving backward.
2. Degenerating; reversing the normal order of growth and development.
3. Used in neuroscience to describe distal-proximal flow, movement, or transport in an axon toward its cell body, or degeneration of an axon proximal to a point of injury, such degenerative changes may extend to, and include, the cell body.
[L. retrogradus, fr. retro- + gradior, to go]

retrograde

/ret·ro·grade/ (ret´ro-grād) going backward; retracing a former course; catabolic.

retrograde

[ret′rəgrād]
Etymology: L, retro + gradus, step
1 moving backward; moving in the opposite direction to that which is considered normal.
2 degenerating; reverting to an earlier state or worse condition.
3 catabolic.

ret·ro·grade

(ret'rō-grād)
1. Moving backward.
2. Degenerating; reversing the normal order of growth and development.
[L. retrogradus, fr. retro-, back + gradior, to go]

retrograde

A going backwards or a reversion of the usual sequence.

ret·ro·grade

(ret'rō-grād)
1. Moving backward.
2. Degenerating; reversing the normal order of growth and development.
[L. retrogradus, fr. retro-, back + gradior, to go]

retrograde,

v to move backward, degenerate, or return to an earlier state or worse condition.

retrograde

going backward; retracting a former course; catabolic.

retrograde pyelography
radiography of the kidney after introduction of contrast medium through the ureter.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, if in our experiments LTF triggered by synaptic application of 5-HT to distal terminals requires retrograde transport to the soma and subsequent somatic protein synthesis, then one might have expected that protein synthesis in the soma could have returned to normal by the time the retrograde signal arrived, and hence LTF blockade might not have occurred.
Given that the actual retrograde message remains unknown, relatively fast signaling pathways, such as calcium waves or a chain of phosphorylation (Sherff and Carew, 1999), might provide a means for 5-HT-treated synapses to communicate with the SN soma, other than the active retrograde transport of molecules that was previously suggested.
Nocodazole disrupts microtubules and blocks both anterograde and retrograde transport (Dinter and Berger, 1998).