retrenchment


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re·trench·ment

(rē-trench'ment),
The cutting away of superfluous tissue.
[F. re-, back, + trancher, to cut]

re·trench·ment

(rē-trench'mĕnt)
The cutting away of superfluous tissue.
[F. re-, back, + trancher, to cut]

retrenchment

[Fr. retrenchier, to cut back]
1. A budgetary reduction; a cutback in the amount of funds allocated for a purpose.
2. A procedure used in plastic surgery to remove excess tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any retrenchment policy that might extend the value of wages received between now and when the mine closes has potential to provide a source of cash to the employees for local investment and capital accumulation.
The CEO has done his part to pre-empt the employees on the possibility of retrenchment as well a* provide the retrenched workers with fair compensation.
The book is not just an excellent description of the New Zealand social security system along with a history of its development and changes post World War II, but is set within an international socio-economic/political framework in order to investigate how and why retrenchment occurred.
Hamel and Schoenfeld confirm what many innovation advocates have been arguing throughout the decade--that cost cutting or retrenchment is not a forward-thinking strategy.
But helping drive Albertson's retrenchment, according to UBS Warburg analyst Neil Currie, is Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
What do the '00s have in store for us--Kyoto fallout, more consolidation, bio- and nano-technology, wireless sensors, consumer retrenchment? With recent events, security would seem to loom large on any corporate agenda.
The acquisition is expected to be immediately accretive to Adobe's revenue base by about $30-$35 million and would cause retrenchment of Accelio's work force by about 200.
This is due to a rare convergence of (a) a healthy agricultural outlook amid (b) a slow general economy -- wounded further by terrorist action and an uncertain global military picture -- which creates (c) extremes of corporate reaction, from retrenchment to aggressiveness.
Commenting on the figures, which show the increase in spending in the industrial sector is less than in recent years, they wrote: "Historically, inflation-adjusted reductions in R&D funding have resulted in periods of retrenchment that lasted over a few years."
Celebrating this anniversary is especially sweet because it reflects the positive growth of black books and reaffirms that reading is a significant part of African-American lifestyles, even in the midst of the current retrenchment in the book market and the magazine environment.
But even when decisionmakers are only somewhat more risk averse, a process of retrenchment can occur.
Rodney Clapp has identified three types of Christian responses to the demise of Christendom: retrenchment, relinquishment, and radicalization.