retract

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re·tract

(rē-trakt'),
To shrink, draw back, or pull apart.
[L. re-traho, pp. -tractus, a drawing back]

retract

(ri-trakt′) [L. retractus, drawn back]
To draw back.
retractable (′ă-bĕl), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Elle a, en outre, ete l'occasion de presenter des exposes et des experiences en matiere de droits au choix, a l'information, a la retractation, a la representation et a la protection des droits economiques ainsi que sur la strategie de protection du consommateur et des mesures de sa mise en oeuvre.
Elsewhere he writes: "at this time, such coercion displeased me because I had not yet learned either how much evil their impunity would dare or to what extent the application of discipline could bring about their improvement": Augustine, Retractationes, ii.5 (ch.
Augustine's thought evolved, as he admitted in the Retractations, and any particular declaration needs to be considered in relation to the circumstances in which it was made, before it is accepted as typical of his theology.
Canisius has in mind Augustine's comment in the Retractations (2.63) about his Enchiridion, a treatise on faith, hope, and love addressed to Laurentius.
L'Homme foudroye se construit donc par avancees et retractations, dans l'attente d'un roman ideal dont le narrateur nous entretient a tout propos mais qui tarde a venir, comme cette Carissima qu'il promet au mllieu du livre (266).
Bogan, Saint Augustine; The Retractations, The Fathers of the Church, lx (washington, D.C., 1968), 217: ~I also wrote two books to Jerome, the priest, who was living in Bethlehem -- one on the origin of the soul of man, the second on a passage from the Apostle James.' (23) CCSL, 57, 126-7; trans.
Thus, like Augustine, who in the Retractations provided later commentary and clarification on all his writings, T.
The first concerns the referential integrity of the text, that point of instability that Gerald himself clearly wishes to bring to the reader's attention in his Retractationes. Since, as Gerald later recognizes, the sexual monstrosities of Ireland were not empirically-observed phenomena, then it is justifiable to postulate that they may be the products of style rather than nature, deliberate misrepresentations intended to occlude fact: after all, the Topographia is populated by prodigies which are indeed hermaphroditic if assessed according to Alain's definitions of the word, home to ladies with beards, to creatures that are male on one side and female on the other, and to the offspring of man and beast.