retire

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retire

1. To discontinue formal employment or work at a specific place or task. In the past, in many industries, educational institutions, and public service, retirement was mandated when an employee had attained a specified age. This practice has lost its attractiveness to a large segment of the workforce, esp. among those who enjoy work. See: recreation
2. To go to bed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The full court characterised the issue in this way: "The case comes down to whether the phrase "retiring from the organisation" simply means departing from the organisation, in which case, provided employees have the requisite service and were employed on the cut-off date, they are entitled to be considered for a retiring gratuity, regardless of what they intend to do after they leave; or whether "retiring from the organisation" has a narrower meaning so that an employee must be intending to withdraw substantively from the workforce.
The retiring ANP senators are Ilyas Ahmed Bilour, Shahi Syed and Baz Muhammad Khan from KP and Daud Achakzai and Zahida Khan from Balochistan.
"All four cases pre-date new legislation, introduced in January 2014 which now prevents officers resigning or retiring prior to any disciplinary procedures against them being heard in full.
After retiring in 1981, he taught at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and John Hopkins' School of Advanced International Studies.
Dave Isley, head of NatWest International Personal Banking, said: "Our latest UK expatriate study has revealed that retiring abroad is still very much a popular choice and expats are happy with their chosen life paths.
The specific benefits of this approach for retiring owner(s) are
Retiring pilots can elect to have half of the pension benefits as a lump sum of money and take the rest as an annuity later on.
Just over 22 per cent of those survey said they were planning to retire before 60 years of age while comparable portions of boomers said they plan on retiring between 60 and 64 years of age or at 65.
Puzzlement or suspicion may be the first reaction from the investment community when a company announces that its CFO is retiring, especially in these days of heightened scrutiny of publicly traded companies and the public fears that such an announcement may be a precursor to bad news.
Romeo Diaz, a surgical oncologist in Westlake, Ohio, reluctantly informed his patients and staff that he was retiring (at age 60) due to his soaring liability insurance bill.
Flynn, who was then retiring as a senior partner of Arthur Young & Company.