reticulum


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reticulum

 [rĕ-tik´u-lum] (L.)
1. a small network, especially a protoplasmic network in cells.
agranular reticulum smooth-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum.
endoplasmic reticulum an ultramicroscopic organelle of nearly all higher plant and animal cells, consisting of a system of membrane-bound cavities in the cytoplasm, occurring in two types: granular or rough-surfaced, bearing large numbers of ribosomes on its outer surface, and agranular or smooth-surfaced.
granular reticulum rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum.
sarcoplasmic reticulum a form of agranular reticulum in the sarcoplasm of striated muscle, comprising a system of smooth-surfaced tubules surrounding each myofibril.

re·tic·u·lum

, pl.

re·tic·u·la

(re-tik'yū-lŭm, -lă), [TA]
1. A fine network formed by cells, or formed of certain structures within cells or of connective tissue fibers between cells.
2. Synonym(s): neuroglia
3. The second compartment of the stomach of a ruminant, a comparatively small chamber communicating with the rumen; sometimes called the honeycomb because of the characteristic structure of its wall.
[L. dim of rete, a net]

reticulum

(rĭ-tĭk′yə-ləm)
n. pl. reticu·la (-lə)
1. A netlike formation or structure; a network.
2. Zoology The second compartment of the stomach of ruminant mammals, lined with a membrane having honeycombed ridges.

re·tic·u·lum

, pl. reticula (rĕ-tik'yū-lŭm, -ă) [TA]
1. A fine network formed by cells, or formed of certain structures within cells or of connective tissue fibers between cells.
2. Synonym(s): neuroglia.
3. The second compartment of the stomach of a ruminant, a comparatively small chamber communicating with the rumen; sometimes called the honeycomb because of the characteristic structure of its wall.
[L. dim of rete, a net]

reticulum

Any netlike structure of the body.

reticulum

  1. the second compartment of the ruminant stomach.
  2. a network, particularly of PROTOPLASM.
References in periodicals archive ?
[14.] Kokame K, Agarwala KL, Kato H, Miyata T Herp, a new ubiquitin-like membrane protein induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.
Endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Numerous vacuoles in the cytoplasm of human oocytes may be caused by swelling and merging of vesicles isolated from smooth endoplasmic reticulum, considered as degenerative processes.
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an intracellular organelle responsible for lipid and protein biosynthesis, protein folding, maturation, and quality control.
Lee, "The ER chaperone and signaling regulator GRP78/BiP as a monitor of endoplasmic reticulum stress," Methods, vol.
Sheferaw, "A postmortem study on indigestible foreign bodies in the rumen and reticulum of ruminants, Eastern Ethiopia," Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research, vol.
HO-1 Activation Could Inhibit Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Reduced ER Stress-Related Lung Injury during Sepsis.
Rumenotomy was performed through center of left para lumbar fossa for retrieval of foreign body from rumen and reticulum (Fig.
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays an essential role in controlling various intracellular physiological functions, including protein translocation, protein folding, calcium homeostasis, and lipid biosynthesis [1], by stimulating the signaling networks that control either cell survival or death when ER transmembrane sensors detect unfolded and misfolded proteins.
Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Signaling Pathways in DN.
Several studies have demonstrated that the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum are intimately associated structurally and biochemically through the mitochondriaER associated membrane or MAM [4-6].