reticuloendothelial


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Related to reticuloendothelial: reticuloendothelial cells

reticuloendothelial

 [rĕ-tik″u-lo-en″do-the´le-al]
pertaining to the reticuloendothelium or to the reticuloendothelial system.
reticuloendothelial system a network of cells and tissues found throughout the body, especially in the blood, general connective tissue, spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. They have both endothelial and reticular attributes and the ability to take up colloidal dye particles. Some of the reticuloendothelial cells found in the blood and in the general connective tissue are unusually large in size. These cells are concerned with blood cell formation and destruction, storage of fatty materials, and metabolism of iron and pigment, and they play a role in inflammation and immunity. Some of the cells are motile—that is, capable of spontaneous motion—and phagocytic—they can ingest and destroy unwanted foreign material.



The reticuloendothelial cells of the spleen possess the ability to dispose of disintegrated erythrocytes. They do not, however, destroy hemoglobin, which is liberated in the process.

The reticuloendothelial cells located in the blood cavities of the liver are called Kupffer cells. These cells, together with the cells of the general connective tissue and bone marrow, are capable of transforming into bile pigment the hemoglobin released by disintegrated erythrocytes.
Reticuloendothelial system. From Frazier et al., 1996.

re·tic·u·lo·en·do·the·li·al

( re-tik'yū-lō-en'dō-thē'lē-ăl),
Denoting or referring to reticuloendothelium. See: reticuloendothelial system.

reticuloendothelial

/re·tic·u·lo·en·do·the·li·al/ (-en″do-the´le-al) pertaining to the reticuloendothelium or to the reticuloendothelial system.

reticuloendothelial

(rĭ-tĭk′yə-lō-ĕn′də-thē′lē-əl)
adj.
Of or relating to the reticuloendothelial system.

re·tic·u·lo·en·do·the·li·al

(rĕ-tik'yū-lō-en'dō-thē'lē-ăl)
Denoting or referring to reticuloendothelium.
References in periodicals archive ?
With continued transfusion, reticuloendothelial cells can no longer safely store all the excess iron, which thus enters the circulation in amounts that exceed the binding capacity of Tf, and NTBI develops [69].
5 nm, while particles larger than that are mainly taken up by the reticuloendothelial system where they end up in the liver and spleen (20).
The pathogenesis of adrenal myelolipomas remains unclear, but most of the evidence supports the metaplastic changes of reticuloendothelial cells of blood capillaries as the etiology (1).
Damage to red blood cells causes the release of hemoglobin into the plasma and the trapping of damaged erythrocytes by the reticuloendothelial system.
This system serves several functions: it effectively delivers iron to the bone marrow for hemoglobin building and erythrocyte production; it transports iron to and from storage sites in the macrophages of the reticuloendothelial (RE) system and the hepatocytes of the liver; it recycles iron from senescent (i.
The most affected organs are lungs, reticuloendothelial system, and rarely adrenal glands, liver, central nervous system and bones.
Hemophagocytic syndrome or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a clinical condition characterized by infiltration of the bone marrow and reticuloendothelial system by macrophages and activated histiocytes, leading to uncontrolled phagocytosis of platelets, erythrocytes, lymphocytes and precursor cells.
Because serum ferritin is an acute-phase reactant and because the inflammatory state may inhibit the mobilization of iron from reticuloendothelial stores, the scenario of patients with serum ferritin >800 ng/ml, suggesting iron overload, and transferrin saturation <20%, suggesting iron deficiency, has become more common.
Role of the reticuloendothelial system in anemia of rheumatoid arthritis.
In patients who receive multiple blood transfusions, the excess iron is initially deposited in the reticuloendothelial system of the liver, spleen and bone marrow as well as in the heart and endocrine system.
The pathophysiology is thought to involve inhalation of the pathogen, followed by its passage from the lungs into the bloodstream and from there to the reticuloendothelial system, where the fungus overwhelms the young child's still-developing immune system.
Vitamin A deficiency contributes to anaemia by immobilising iron in the reticuloendothelial system, reducing haemopoiesis and increasing susceptibility to infections.