reticuloendothelial


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Related to reticuloendothelial: reticuloendothelial cells

reticuloendothelial

 [rĕ-tik″u-lo-en″do-the´le-al]
pertaining to the reticuloendothelium or to the reticuloendothelial system.
reticuloendothelial system a network of cells and tissues found throughout the body, especially in the blood, general connective tissue, spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. They have both endothelial and reticular attributes and the ability to take up colloidal dye particles. Some of the reticuloendothelial cells found in the blood and in the general connective tissue are unusually large in size. These cells are concerned with blood cell formation and destruction, storage of fatty materials, and metabolism of iron and pigment, and they play a role in inflammation and immunity. Some of the cells are motile—that is, capable of spontaneous motion—and phagocytic—they can ingest and destroy unwanted foreign material.



The reticuloendothelial cells of the spleen possess the ability to dispose of disintegrated erythrocytes. They do not, however, destroy hemoglobin, which is liberated in the process.

The reticuloendothelial cells located in the blood cavities of the liver are called Kupffer cells. These cells, together with the cells of the general connective tissue and bone marrow, are capable of transforming into bile pigment the hemoglobin released by disintegrated erythrocytes.
Reticuloendothelial system. From Frazier et al., 1996.

re·tic·u·lo·en·do·the·li·al

( re-tik'yū-lō-en'dō-thē'lē-ăl),
Denoting or referring to reticuloendothelium. See: reticuloendothelial system.

reticuloendothelial

(rĭ-tĭk′yə-lō-ĕn′də-thē′lē-əl)
adj.
Of or relating to the reticuloendothelial system.

re·tic·u·lo·en·do·the·li·al

(rĕ-tik'yū-lō-en'dō-thē'lē-ăl)
Denoting or referring to reticuloendothelium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic association of reticuloendothelial activity in chickens.
Tf incorporates iron coming from two major sources: dietary iron (both inorganic and heme iron) absorbed in the duodenum to compensate for daily iron loss and iron derived from destruction of old and effete erythrocytes by reticuloendothelial cells in the spleen and liver (Figure 3).
Splenectomy can also serve as a therapeutic option by removing the major reticuloendothelial reservoir.
It also should not be forgotten that in HH, serum iron levels and the transferrin saturation rate can be within normal limits in cases with an excessive accumulation of iron in reticuloendothelial system organs and higher ferritin levels.
Leprosy is a systemic disease involving skin, nerves and the reticuloendothelial system, the liver being the commonest internal organ affected.
The micelle was recognized by reticuloendothelial system (RES), which is self-defense system of living organisms, and its undesired uptake at liver and spleen was high.
PEG provides a desirable coating for nanotubes and nanoparticles, because it reduces their immunogenicity and reduces their chance of being nonspecifically taken up by cells of the reticuloendothelial system.
As in tuberculosis, macrophages assist in dissemination of the organism via lymphatics and the blood to the adjacent lymph nodes and throughout the reticuloendothelial system (liver, spleen, lymph nodes, adrenal glands, and bone marrow).
Any excessive accumulation in storage sites, primarily the hepatic parenchyma and reticuloendothelial cells, is shown by raised ferritin levels and percentage saturation of transferrin.
On systemic examination other systems were found to be normal including the reticuloendothelial system.
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a predominant pathogen associated with chronic pulmonary infection and mortality in CF.[sup.17] Extrapulmonary spread of infection is quite rare, likely owing to enhanced immune complex formation and reticuloendothelial clearance in CF patients.[sup.3,4] However, there have been case reports of extrapulmonary spread of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in immunocompetent CF patients chronically infected with the mucoid strain of this organism with bacteremia, endopthalmitis and pericarditis.[sup.18]-[sup.21] In most cases, patients had poor outcomes, ranging from enucleation to death, despite prompt diagnosis and treatment for their extrapulmonary infections.