reticular fibers


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re·tic·u·lar fi·bers

the collagen (type III) fibers forming the distinctive loose connective tissue stroma of embryonic tissues, mesenchyme, red pulp of the spleen, cortex and medulla of lymph nodes, and the hematopoietic compartments of bone marrow; they account for a substantial portion of the collagen fibers of the skin, liver, blood vessels, synovial membrane, uterine tissue, and granulation tissue; characterized by organization as a reticular meshwork of fine filaments and by an affinity for silver and for periodic acid-Schiff stains.

re·tic·u·lar fi·bers

(rĕ-tik'yū-lăr fī'bĕrz)
The collagen (type III) fibers forming the distinctive loose connective tissue stroma of embryonic tissues, mesenchyme, red pulp of the spleen, cortex and medulla of lymph nodes, and the hematopoietic compartments of bone marrow, and accounting for a substantial portion of the collagen fibers of the skin, blood vessels, synovial membrane, uterine tissue, and granulation tissue; characterized by its organization as a reticular meshwork of fine filaments and an affinity for silver and for periodic acid-Schiff stains.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bracket of glands was constituted with collagen fibers and reticular fibers. Due to muscularis mucosa embedding into the lamina propria, we could see more smooth muscle fibers at the bottom of glands in the lamina propria.
(iii) Stromal Matrix: Compact layer (5-20 [micro]m) - thought to be strongest layer comprised of a complex network of reticular fibers. This layer is thought to contribute to the tensile strength of AM.
The finest and shortest crystals are found on the surface of the reticular fibers of the lymph glands.
The bundles of muscle fibers are surrounded by a connective tissue layer (perimysium), while each muscle fiber is covered by an endomysium, consisting of connective tissue, which is arranged in reticular fibers (MacConnachie et al., 1964; Nishimura et al., 1994).