retention

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Related to retentive: retentive memory

retention

 [re-ten´shun]
1. the process of holding back or keeping in a position.
2. persistence in the body of material normally excreted, such as from the bowel or bladder.
3. the number of staff members in a facility that remain in employment.
urinary retention a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has incomplete emptying of the bladder.
retention of urine accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn),
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially food and drink in the stomach.
See also: memory.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, as urine or feces.
See also: memory.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory.
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. In dentistry, a passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention

/re·ten·tion/ (re-ten´shun) the process of holding back or keeping in position, as persistence in the body of material normally excreted, or maintenance of a dental prosthesis in proper position in the mouth.

retention

(rĭ-tĕn′shən)
n.
1. The act of retaining or the condition of being retained: the retention of nutrients in the soil; the retention of jobs in the city.
2. The practice of requiring a student to repeat a class or a year of school because of insufficient educational progress to advance.
3. The ability to recall or recognize what has been learned or experienced; memory.
4. The inability of a person or animal to eliminate a bodily waste.

retention

[riten′shən]
1 a resistance to movement or displacement.
2 the ability of the digestive system to hold food and fluid.
3 the inability to urinate or defecate.
4 the ability of the mind to remember information acquired from reading, observation, or other processes.
5 the inherent property of a dental restoration to maintain its position without displacement under axial stress.
6 a characteristic of proper tooth cavity preparation in which provision is made for preventing vertical displacement of the cavity filling.
7 a period of treatment during which an individual wears an appliance to maintain teeth in positions to which they have been moved by orthodontic procedures. retain, v.

retention

Neurology See Memory UrologySee Urinary retention.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially the retaining of food and drink in the stomach.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, such as urine or feces.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. dentistry A passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
2. Resistance to dislodgement.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention

the process of holding back or keeping in a position, such as persistence in the body of material normally excreted. See also retained.

renal retention cysts
these are acquired and result from scarring and obstruction of tubules in chronic renal disease.
urine retention
accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Magnets are used as retentive aid for sectional dentures, hemi-maxillectomy, obturators, complete dentures or extensively atrophied ridges.
Depomed's Acuform gastric retentive drug delivery technology will be used by Ironwood Pharmaceuticals Inc for the latter's early stage development programme, continuing its efforts to augment its development pipeline beyond linaclotide.
COMEDY GOLD: More daft goings-on in Rob Brydon's Annually Retentive, BBC3, 10.
Aeration is also helpful, as is application of wetting agents that make water stickier and soil more water retentive.
Key features of the Ethernet Controller include a 32bit RISC processor; 512kb program memory, 24kb retentive memory, 100Mbits/s Ethernet, IEC-61131-3 programming and the latest open architecture software interfaces and protocols including the industrial Ethernet protocols ModbusTCP and EtherNet/IP.
Characteristically the concrete performs more than one task: as well as holding up the library, it carries communications, fire alarm, and security system points cast within it, while its heat retentive mass plays a key part in controlling the effects of solar irradiation.
It thrives in partial shade in moist soil, so use a loam-based, water retentive compost and make sure you don't let it dry out in summer.
This funding supports Depomed in the development of a gastric retentive extended-release tablet of levodopa/carbidopa that targets constant blood levels of levodopa compared to current therapy while reducing dosing frequency and maintaining effectiveness in controlling Parkinson's disease symptoms.
Patented is an absorbent article having a liquid retentive absorbent layer and a liquid impermeable leak preventive layer.
Blurring the lines between fiction and reality, Annually Retentive features behind-the-scenes footage of Rob, the writers and team captains as they prepare for the show, plus snippets of the actual quiz.
But don't worry - it's just for the spoof quiz show Annually Retentive, which is back for a second run on BBC3 on Monday.