retention


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retention

 [re-ten´shun]
1. the process of holding back or keeping in a position.
2. persistence in the body of material normally excreted, such as from the bowel or bladder.
3. the number of staff members in a facility that remain in employment.
urinary retention a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has incomplete emptying of the bladder.
retention of urine accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn),
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially food and drink in the stomach.
See also: memory.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, as urine or feces.
See also: memory.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory.
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. In dentistry, a passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention

/re·ten·tion/ (re-ten´shun) the process of holding back or keeping in position, as persistence in the body of material normally excreted, or maintenance of a dental prosthesis in proper position in the mouth.

retention

(rĭ-tĕn′shən)
n.
1. The act of retaining or the condition of being retained: the retention of nutrients in the soil; the retention of jobs in the city.
2. The practice of requiring a student to repeat a class or a year of school because of insufficient educational progress to advance.
3. The ability to recall or recognize what has been learned or experienced; memory.
4. The inability of a person or animal to eliminate a bodily waste.

retention

[riten′shən]
1 a resistance to movement or displacement.
2 the ability of the digestive system to hold food and fluid.
3 the inability to urinate or defecate.
4 the ability of the mind to remember information acquired from reading, observation, or other processes.
5 the inherent property of a dental restoration to maintain its position without displacement under axial stress.
6 a characteristic of proper tooth cavity preparation in which provision is made for preventing vertical displacement of the cavity filling.
7 a period of treatment during which an individual wears an appliance to maintain teeth in positions to which they have been moved by orthodontic procedures. retain, v.

retention

Neurology See Memory UrologySee Urinary retention.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially the retaining of food and drink in the stomach.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, such as urine or feces.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. dentistry A passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
2. Resistance to dislodgement.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention

the process of holding back or keeping in a position, such as persistence in the body of material normally excreted. See also retained.

renal retention cysts
these are acquired and result from scarring and obstruction of tubules in chronic renal disease.
urine retention
accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The question of employees' retention becomes more consequential for the companies in case of high potential staff who is potent to shoulder higher responsibilities in future, "because it takes a considerable time to reach that position (Dries and Pepermans, 2007a).
Key Words: Retention, complete dentures, denture adhesives.
The Avalere analysts divided PPACA exchanges into three categories: Those with projected retention rates over 85 percent, those with projected retention rates under 75 percent, and those with projected retention rates from 75 percent to 85 percent.
A single predetermined retention period applies to official copies of most e-mail messages with exceptions for certain messages that need to be retained for a longer or shorter amount of time as determined by legal, operational, or historical considerations.
If this is the case, then failing to release retention is a penalty rather than security.
With the publication of this article, the correlation of undergraduate hardiness with undergraduate retention to expected graduation year has been demonstrated again, this time among 1,432 diverse, arriving first-year students distributed among five campuses.
Brine Ranson noted the example of a fine paper mill that was successfully using a micropolymer/APAM retention and drainage program.
It specifies the basic, essential retention and documentation requirements for books and records maintained on computer systems; see Rev.
Managing e-mail as a business process involves the three major areas of retention, disposition and accessibility.
In addition, The Sarbanes-OxleyAct of 2002 and regulations promulgated thereunder established record retention requirements for accounting firms that audited publicly traded companies.
The district's decision to hire teachers for summer school--part of the retention plan--outside of union hiring rules created another furor.