retention


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retention

 [re-ten´shun]
1. the process of holding back or keeping in a position.
2. persistence in the body of material normally excreted, such as from the bowel or bladder.
3. the number of staff members in a facility that remain in employment.
urinary retention a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has incomplete emptying of the bladder.
retention of urine accumulation of urine within the bladder because of inability to urinate.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn),
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially food and drink in the stomach.
See also: memory.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, as urine or feces.
See also: memory.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory.
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. In dentistry, a passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

retention

(rĭ-tĕn′shən)
n.
1. The act of retaining or the condition of being retained: the retention of nutrients in the soil; the retention of jobs in the city.
2. The practice of requiring a student to repeat a class or a year of school because of insufficient educational progress to advance.
3. The ability to recall or recognize what has been learned or experienced; memory.
4. The inability of a person or animal to eliminate a bodily waste.

retention

Neurology See Memory UrologySee Urinary retention.

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. The keeping in the body of what normally belongs there, especially the retaining of food and drink in the stomach.
2. The keeping in the body of what normally should be discharged, such as urine or feces.
3. Retaining that which has been learned so that it can be used later as in recall, recognition, or, if retention is partial, relearning.
See also: memory
4. Resistance to dislodgement.
5. dentistry A passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize the teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
[L. retentio, a holding back]

re·ten·tion

(rē-ten'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, passive period following treatment when a patient is wearing an appliance or appliances to maintain or stabilize teeth in the new position into which they have been moved.
2. Resistance to dislodgement.
[L. retentio, a holding back]
References in periodicals archive ?
Westminster has repeatedly failed to tackle the controversial use of 'retentions' to delay payments in the construction industry.
aACAo Diet : Salt (sodium) rich food which are mostly include the processed food like meat, crackers, chips, canned vegetables, soups, fast food and even soft drinks can cause water retention.
This Article will examine the results of retention elections in Alaska and nationwide, in order to assess the risk that Alaska's retention candidates face and determine whether that risk is increasing.
True retention is the recommended method for calculating micronutrient retention.
The question of employees' retention becomes more consequential for the companies in case of high potential staff who is potent to shoulder higher responsibilities in future, "because it takes a considerable time to reach that position (Dries and Pepermans, 2007a).
Key Words: Retention, complete dentures, denture adhesives.
To resolve this, many organizations are seeking ways to eliminate retention times based on trigger events and are using instead straight retention time periods, in which the time for calculating the disposition of a record begins at its creation.
Last year, 89.9% of optometry and dispensing optics students applied for retention by the July deadline, the GOC confirmed.
The Avalere analysts divided PPACA exchanges into three categories: Those with projected retention rates over 85 percent, those with projected retention rates under 75 percent, and those with projected retention rates from 75 percent to 85 percent.
Setting the right retention level can be challenging, though.
Insurers may want "collateral" to ensure that there are sufficient funds for a manufacturer to pay losses within a retention.