retained surgical sponge

retained surgical sponge

A term of art referring to an intraoperative mistake discovered postoperatively, in which one or more surgical sponges, gauze pads or other form of textile is left behind in the operative field after closing the patient. Retained surgical sponges may become a nidus for infection, and are often grounds for malpractice lawsuits.
References in periodicals archive ?
A retained surgical sponge or gossypiboma is a rare and an underreported complication occurring most commonly after abdominal surgeries.
Complete migration of retained surgical sponge into ileum without sign of open intestinal wall.
Maull, "Natural History of the Retained Surgical Sponge," in Proceedings of the Section on Surgery, Southern Medical Association, 75th Annual Scientific Assembly, New Orleans, LA, 1981.
Intracolonic obstruction induced by a retained surgical sponge after trauma laparotomy.
Retained surgical sponge (gossypiboma) after intraabdominal or retroperitoneal surgery: 14 cases treated at a single center.
The retained surgical sponge or gauze after surgical intervention or a birth can have serious consequences for patients and poses a challenging problem for clinicians.
We present a case of retained surgical sponge removed 2 years after cesarean section/hysterotomy.
The term Gossypiboma, derived from the Latin word "gossypium" (cotton) and the Swahilli "Boma" (place of concealment) (1) denotes retained surgical sponge. The condition may manifest as an exudative inflammatory reaction with formation of abscess or aseptic fibrotic reaction with formation of a mass (2).
Kaiser CW, Friedman S, Spurling KP, Slowick T, Kaiser HA 1996 The retained surgical sponge Annals of Surgery 224 79-84
Gossypiboma (which is also known as textiloma, cottonoid, and gauzeoma) is a mass formed by a retained surgical sponge surrounded by encapsulating reactive tissue.1 It was first described in 1884 by Wilson.2 The term is derived from the Latin word gossypium, meaning "cotton," and the Kiswahili word boma, which means "place of concealment." 3 It is not possible to precisely determine the true incidence of gossypiboma because of legal and medical concerns that lead to underreporting of cases and because some patients remain asymptomatic for years.4 However, the incidence has been reported as 1 in 100 to 3000 for all surgical interventions and 1 in 1000 to 1500 for abdominal surgery.
They involved her failure to respond to calls and initiate timely treatment, a broken humerus and permanent nerve injury following a birth, and a retained surgical sponge. The Patient Care Committee of the OB/GYN Department (PCC) reviewed the reports and concluded that continued observation of Dr.
A retained surgical sponge mimicking a gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor: report of a case.