retained bullet

A bullet that remains in the body after a gunshot, either because it wasn’t found or because it lodged in an inaccessible site or would create vascular or neural problems if removed

retained bullet

Forensic medicine A bullet that remains in the body after a gunshot, either because it wasn't found or because it lodged in an inaccessible site or would create vascular or neural problems if removed
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On the other hand, a retained bullet in a joint can not only lead to mechanical damage and proliferative synovitis but also can cause systemic absorption of lead and lead poisoning.3 These patients can present with the non-specific neurologic, and gastrointestinal symptoms of lead poisoning and these cases can be difficult to diagnose.
The exact location of the retained bullet prior to migration into the bladder was not clear.
Once, in an effort to compare penetration and retained bullet weights of three handgun cartridges, I fired JHP's from each into a railroad tie.
Retained bullet fragments (RBFs) are an infrequently reported, but important, cause of lead toxicity; symptoms are often nonspecific and can appear years after suffering a gunshot wound (2,3).
Radiographs revealed a retained bullet and metallic debris in the right femoral head (Fig.
The retained bullet weight was 106.8 grains--or 85%--and it penetrated to a depth of 16.25 inches.
Lead toxicity in a 14-year-old female with retained bullet fragments.
This situation is unique in that an exploratory procedure may not truly be necessary if concomitant organ injury is absent and the perforation is extraperitoneal, but conservative management with catheter drainage alone does not address the retained bullet.
Increased lead absorption and lead poisoning from a retained bullet. J Okla State Med Assoc 82:63-67 (1989).
A radiograph of the right elbow revealed a retained bullet within the confines of a well-defined cystic soft tissue lesion, posterior to the distal end of the humerus (Figure 1, arrowheads).
Lead poisoning is a reportable disease in the United States, affecting nearly 700,000 American children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years.[1] The usual source of environmental exposure to lead is paint in old houses that are dilapidated or undergoing renovation[2] Few cases of elevated lead levels from retained bullet fragments have been reported in the literature.