resuscitate

(redirected from resuscitations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

re·sus·ci·tate

(rē-sŭs'i-tāt),
To perform resuscitation.
[L. resuscito, to raise up again, revive]

resuscitate

(rĭ-sŭs′ĭ-tāt′)
tr.v. resusci·tated, resusci·tating, resusci·tates
To restore consciousness or other signs of life to (one who appears dead): resuscitated the man after cardiac arrest.

re·sus′ci·ta·ble (-tə-bəl) adj.
re·sus′ci·ta′tion n.
re·sus′ci·ta′tive adj.

re·sus·ci·tate

(rē-sŭs'i-tāt)
To perform resuscitation.
[L. resuscito, to raise up again, revive]
References in periodicals archive ?
After randomization, each participant underwent 2 min of single-rescuer-simulated cardiac arrest resuscitation. The single-rescuer scenario was selected as this is often the setting during the initial phases of a cardiac arrest event.
CHICAGO -- Two changes have occurred in guidance related to resuscitation of newborns in the delivery room, according to Gary M.
Methods: This study was conducted at the Malatya State Hospital, Malatya, Turkey, from January to December 2014, and comprised patients who had received cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Patients were divided into two groups; in-hospital cardiac arrest and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
(4) Oxygen debt due to ischemia during hemorrhagic shock causes organ dysfunction and ultimately death if not reversed with timely resuscitation. Shock causes endothelial dysfunction and this has been associated with the development of a primary or endogenous coagulopathy which includes activation of fibrinolysis.
A lack of clarity exists within the literature on code team composition and team members' specific roles during a resuscitation (Lauridsen, Schmits, Adelborg, & Lefgren, 2015).
I became interested in resuscitation more than 25 years ago.
Newborn resuscitation has an interesting and colourful history which stretches back hundreds of years.
The simulation was held on May 11, 2007, at Victoria General Hospital in Winnipeg, MB, during which participants listened to didactic instruction in the latest techniques in resuscitation with an emphasis on the importance of each team member's role during a cardiac arrest situation.
Numerous national and international descriptive and qualitative studies (Level VI) and seven well-documented literature reviews have addressed the issues of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) and reveal consistent findings as described below.
Debriefings were conducted in the same manner for both study groups following mega code resuscitations in order to isolate whether the HFS teaching method was superior to the LFS teaching method.
Two European surveys, undertaken in collaboration with the European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations and the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care [3,4] have shown that, given a choice, most relatives of patients in the USA and the UK would choose to be present during resuscitation.
Nonetheless, general guidelines for fluid resuscitation in avian patients are similar to those used in small animal practice.