resuscitate

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re·sus·ci·tate

(rē-sŭs'i-tāt),
To perform resuscitation.
[L. resuscito, to raise up again, revive]

resuscitate

(rĭ-sŭs′ĭ-tāt′)
tr.v. resusci·tated, resusci·tating, resusci·tates
To restore consciousness or other signs of life to (one who appears dead): resuscitated the man after cardiac arrest.

re·sus′ci·ta·ble (-tə-bəl) adj.
re·sus′ci·ta′tion n.
re·sus′ci·ta′tive adj.

re·sus·ci·tate

(rē-sŭs'i-tāt)
To perform resuscitation.
[L. resuscito, to raise up again, revive]
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common way of doing resuscitation is through a series of chest compressions, airway management techniques and rescue breathing known as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR.
Like other areas of medical science, "best practice" in resuscitation changes as new evidence comes to hand.
Two European surveys, undertaken in collaboration with the European federation of Critical Care Nursing associations and the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care [3,4] have shown that, given a choice, most relatives of patients in the USA and the UK would choose to be present during resuscitation.
Research studies conducted with regard to the opinions of health professionals have showed that those approving of family presence said that it helped relatives to see the effort of the resuscitation team and that everything that could have been done had been done, which may lower the risk of litigation surrounding the resuscitation.
Arguably one of the more challenging aspects of the initial management of severe burn casualties is the fluid resuscitation necessary to prevent or mitigate burn shock and multiple organ failure.
Despite general instructions that the predicted fluid requirements are designed to serve only as guidelines, and that actual resuscitation should be based on patient response, many nonburn providers either err on the side of adhering strictly to the formulae regardless of patient response, or not utilizing them at all.
Concerns that FPDR is disruptive during the resuscitation and traumatic for the family are not substantiated by surveys and interviews conducted with family members at various time intervals after the event.
Discuss with family how they would like to be involved and whether they want to be present in the resuscitation room.
The benefits of having family members present during resuscitation include imparting loving and caring feelings to the dying patient, establishing an empathic and compassionate atmosphere for the patient and family, meeting their emotional needs, and promoting their grieving process.
Based on the concept that nurses are obligated to advocate for the primacy of the patient's interests by meeting the comprehensive needs of patients and their families, healthcare workers should balance the needs of the patient and family and the preferences of medical staff that carry out the resuscitation by allowing family members to witness the procedure.
The program consists of a number of elements including a new and innovative Advanced Resuscitation Training program, a new and novel in-patient treatment algorithm, education, a rapid response team, and new technology to improve pre-, intra- and post- resuscitation care and process, according to Dr.
Resuscitation is a word that arouses feelings of fear and dread in many of us.