restraint


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Related to restraint: restraint of trade, chemical restraint

restraint

 [re-strānt´]
the forcible confinement or control of a subject, as of a confused, disoriented, psychotic, or irrational person; it may be either physical or chemical. Restraint of any kind is used only when the patient's behavior presents a danger to himself or herself or another person. It is never used for the convenience of staff or as a substitute for conscientious nursing care.



Chemical restraint refers to the quieting of a violently psychotic or irrational person by means of medication. Physical restraints include restraining mitts to prevent removal of drainage tubes, restraints of upper and lower limbs to limit mobility and prevent the patient from climbing out of bed or physically harming someone at the bedside, and waist and body restraints such as a camisole (straitjacket). Even though the patient might not fully understand the need for restraint, a brief explanation of why it is being done should be given.

Assessment of the need for physical restraint includes a systematic determination of the level of confusion or disorientation exhibited by the patient and objective observations of his behavior. If possible, the cause of the patient's behavior should be identified, e.g., trauma, drug or alcohol intoxication, electrolyte imbalance, elevated temperature, pain, fear, or mental exhaustion. Findings of the assessment should be well documented in specific terms for legal reasons as well as to inform other caretakers and provide continuity of care.

Alternatives to physical restraint include reality orientation for disoriented patients (clocks, radio, television, newspapers, and magazines will all aid patients to orient themselves to reality); controlling the environment to minimize confusion and stimulation (restraints can intensify anxiety and confusion); and constant attendance at the bedside.

Since restraint of patients subjects them to the hazards of immobility, it is essential that they be monitored closely, their vital signs checked regularly, and their position changed at least every two hours. The use of restraints is an active area of nursing research. The most appropriate and least restrictive type of restraint should always be the one chosen.
Types of restraints: A, Chest restraint; B, Hand mitt restraint; C, Belt restraint; D, Mummy restraint. From Lammon et al., 1996.
jacket restraint camisole.
physical restraint
1. see restraint.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application, monitoring, and removal of mechanical restraining devices or manual restraints which are used to limit the physical mobility of a patient.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·straint

(rē-strānt'),
In hospital psychiatry, intervention to prevent an excited or violent patient from harming himself, herself, or others; may involve the use of a camisole (straitjacket).
[O. Fr. restrainte]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

restraint

(rĭ-strānt′)
n.
1. A device or other means of limiting movement, used to prevent the infliction of harm to self or others.
2. The act of restraining.
3. Control or repression of feelings; constraint.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

restraint

A term for mild bondage used in sexual fantasy enactments.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

restraint

Control or prevention of an action Nursing Any device used to restrict the free movement of Pts with behavioral or physical problems, who may cause harm to themselves and others. See Mechanical restraint, Pharmacologic restraint.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

re·straint

(rĕ-strānt')
psychiatry Intervention to prevent an excited or violent patient from doing harm to her- or himself or others; may involve the use of a camisole (straightjacket).
[O. Fr. restrainte]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(47) This rule requires the accused to be arraigned within 120 days of the imposition of restraint. (48) The only remedy for violating this provision is dismissal, with or without prejudice.
It shall be unlawful for the driver of a covered vehicle not to properly secure at all times a child in a child restraint system while the engine is running or transporting such child on any road, street or highway unless the child is at least 150 centimeters or 59 inches in height, and is properly secured using the regular seat belt.
22, made it illegal for the driver of a covered vehicle not to use a child restraint system-infant seats or booster seats designed to reduce the risk of injury in case of an accident-while the engine is running.
The appeal for restraint preceded Pakistan's military response to the Indian air strike of Tuesday in which PAF brought down two Indian jets on Wednesday.
For adults, restraint use was 65% overall (n=1 003), an increase from 50% in 2008.
Through review of the current site policy, a restraint alternative table was determined to be already available as an attachment referenced within the policy.
D&G, a cold storage and transportation company in Germantown, Wisc., operates a distribution center with several loading docks, all equipped with vertical-storing levelers and truck-positioned vehicle restraints (TPR).
Manual restraint is a commonplace technique used when working with avian species, whether in a clinical or research setting.
Research by Mind Cymru shows that there were 158 incidences of face-down restraint in Wales from April 2015 to April 2016.
Despite uncertainty over the ability of physical restraints to maintain patient safety, as well as the potential for undesirable psychological patient outcomes and ethical concerns, physical restraint use is common in ICUs of many countries with prevalence ranging from 0% to 100% (Benbenbishty, Adam, & Endacott, 2010).