restenosis


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Related to restenosis: Neointimal Hyperplasia

restenosis

 [re″stĕ-no´sis]
recurrent stenosis, especially of a cardiac valve or coronary artery after surgical correction of the primary condition.
false restenosis stenosis recurring after failure to divide either commissure of a cardiac valve beyond the area of incision of the papillary muscles.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·ste·no·sis

(rē'ste-nō'sis),
Recurrence of stenosis after corrective surgery on the heart valve; narrowing of a structure (usually a coronary artery) following the removal or reduction of a previous narrowing.
[re-, + G. stenōsis, a narrowing]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

restenosis

Cardiology The reocclusion of an artery or lumen after otherwise adequate therapy, which may occur in a mitral valve after replacement or valvoplasty, or in a coronary artery after CABG, PCTA, or stenting. See Atherosclerosis, CABG, In-stent restenosis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

re·ste·no·sis

(rē'stĕ-nō'sis)
Recurrence of stenosis after corrective surgery on the heart valve; narrowing of a structure (usually a coronary artery) following the removal or reduction of a previous narrowing.
[re-, + G. stenōsis, a narrowing]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

restenosis

Relapse to the narrowed state, as may happen in a coronary artery following successful widening by balloon angioplasty. Stenting is commonly used to prevent restenosis.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Restenosis

The narrowing of a blood vessel after it has been opened, usually by balloon angioplasty.
Mentioned in: Coronary Stenting
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Currently, in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a problem in percutaneous coronary intervention as it is associated with a high rate of repeat revascularization.[1] Previous study has demonstrated the efficacy of drug-eluting stent (DES) for the treatment of ISR.[2] Nevertheless, with increased risk of late stent thrombosis (ST) due to incomplete endothelialization and inflammatory response, first-generation DES is restricted to longer-term dual antiplatelet therapy compared with bare-metal stent (BMS).[3] Recent network meta-analysis indicates that new-generation DES is associated with significantly lower rates of ST as compared to BMS and first-generation DES, which makes it an appropriate choice for the treatment of ISR.[4]
Although percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) revolutionized the management of coronary artery disease (CAD),[1] restenosis after a successful balloon coronary angioplasty or intracoronary stent placement remains the Achilles' heel of PCI.
Initially, rates of restenosis following PCI with balloon angioplasty were 30-40% and 20-25% with bare-metal stent2.
Although calcified neointima is negligible, there have been few reports to date focusing on in-stent restenosis with calcified neointima [9].
Restenosis was defined as >2.4 of the peak systolic velocity index by duplex at the target lesion and/or >50% grade of obstruction in the SFA stent by peripheral angiography.
Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of central venous stenosis provides excellent immediate results but long term patency reported to be 10-30% at one year and restenosis were reported.
The rate of restenosis has decreased since drug-eluting stents (DES) were invented; a DES is a stent that slowly releases a drug that helps prevent the growth of scar tissue and the buildup of plaque inside the artery.
Clinical, physiologic, anatomic and procedural factors predictive of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.
Restenosis is a serious complication for the treatment of coronary atherosclerosis with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
However, restenosis, or the recurrence of the narrowing of the vessel, after treatment of long and complex arterial obstructions BTK has been reported to occur up to 75% of the time within three months of the initial revascularization.
M2 PHARMA-April 27, 2017-Mercator MedSystems enrolls first patient under TANGO Trial to assess delivery of a -Limus Agent to prevent BTK Restenosis
Nuri from Tahir Heart Institute Chenab Nagar talked about In-stent restenosis. He pointed out that with DES; there were few re-stenoses.