ressentiment


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

ressentiment

(rə-säN′tē-mäN′)
n.
A generalized feeling of resentment and often hostility harbored by one individual or group against another, especially chronically and with no means of direct expression.
References in periodicals archive ?
This juxtaposition of values, the hubris of the 'master' morality embedded within the ressentiment of the 'slave' morality, is also evinced in the norms of personal honor observed in early modern Scotland, where ".
This return of ressentiment is the subject of Pankaj Mishra's new book, Age of Anger.
He explains, for instance, that Amery's use of ressentiment is "a counterpoint to the consensual valuation of empathy and pardon as personal virtues" as well as "an antithesis to the contemporary politics of amnesty and atonement as universal paradigms" (Fassin 251).
29) They also convincingly argue that while Nietzsche was opposed to priestly Judaism (and its offspring Christianity) as harboring the prototypical morality of ressentiment, he defended 19th-century Jews and their culture against Christian anti-Semitism, as evidenced, for example, by his break with Wagner.
In Ressentiment, Scheler suggests that the humanitarian movement is fundamentally a ressentiment phenomenon, a fact that is evident "from the very fact that this socio-historical emotion is by no means based on a spontaneous and original affirmation of positive values, but on a protest, a counter-impulse (hatred, envy, revenge).
4) Thus, one's reservations with ressentiment are germane; but they do not constitute grounds for dismissing the heady analysis of Stanley Hauerwas.
Leadership by resentment; from ressentiment to redemption.
Il vous le dit d'ailleurs bien souvent, vous trouve extremement [beaucoup moins que]mechante[beaucoup plus grand que], meme s'il se sent coupable d'eprouver un tel ressentiment contre vous, sa maman, personnage sacre.
I therefore turned to Friedrich Nietzsche and his concept of ressentiment to help me consider the 'how' and 'what' of this commonly-used word.
The final section of the text is "Semi-Detachment," which provides a discourse on nostalgia and ressentiment as techniques for managing the nation's changing relationship with imperialism.
Yet, with a couple of important exceptions (see Steedman: 1986; Ngai: 2005) the reception of envy within feminism remains uneasy, and often mistakenly conflated, I argue below, with a feminist critique of the politics of ressentiment.
This ressentiment was both uncharitable and untrue.