resorb


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resorb

 [re-sorb´]
to take up or absorb again; to undergo resorption.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·sorb

(rē-sōrb'),
To reabsorb; to absorb what has been excreted, as an exudate or pus.
[L. re-sorbeo, to suck back]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

resorb

(rē-zôrb′, -sôrb′)
v. re·sorbed, re·sorbing, re·sorbs
v.tr.
1. To absorb again.
2. Biology To dissolve and assimilate (bone tissue, for example).
v.intr.
To undergo resorption.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

re·sorb

(rē-sōrb')
To reabsorb; to absorb what has been excreted, as an exudate or pus.
[L. re-sorbeo, to suck back]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Another disadvantage of zinc-oxide eugenol paste is that it results in problems with the coming permanent tooth and causes wastes in the tissues following the deciduous tooth since it is not resorbed in accordance with the root resorption (41,42).
This material was found to be easy to apply and resorbs at a slightly faster rate than that of the root.
About half of the premolars had achieved half root formation when three fourths of the primary molar roots were resorbed.
For example, not only is the length of gestation dramatically different, but rats and mice will resorb fetuses rather than deliver them prematurely.
In addition, the beetle's life-span was significantly shortened on eggplant, and after 30 days adults began to resorb their ovaries.
Their flesh goes mushy and their stomachs resorb. The males develop strange new teeth along suddenly protuberant lower jaws; some even grow teeth on their tongues.
Would it continue to grow, maintain the right shape and size, allow the scaffold to resorb? Would it be a meniscus?
In cats with this condition, one or more teeth slowly break down and resorb, exposing the pulp of the tooth.
Osteoclasts are multinucleated giant cells with unique morphological characteristics that allow them to resorb bone matrix (Rodan and Martin 2000).
[3] But patients exposed to bisphosphonates may also develop a condition like osteopetrosis as bisphosphonates incorporate with apatite crystals of bone making the bone difficult to resorb. [4]