resolution

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resolution

 [rez″o-loo´shun]
1. subsiding of a pathologic state, such as the reduction of inflammation or the softening and disappearance of swelling.
2. perception of two adjacent points as separate; in microscopy, the smallest distance at which two adjacent objects can be distinguished as separate.
3. in radiology, a measure of how much detail a device can print or display.

res·o·lu·tion (Rs),

(rez'ō-lū'shŭn),
1. The arrest of an inflammatory process without suppuration; the absorption or breaking down and removal of the products of inflammation or of a new growth.
2. The optic ability to distinguish detail such as the separation of closely adjacent objects. Synonym(s): resolving power (3)
[L. resolutio, a slackening, fr. re-solvo, pp. -solutus, to loosen, relax]

resolution

/res·o·lu·tion/ (rez″o-loo´shun)
1. subsidence of a pathologic state.
2. perception as separate of two adjacent points; in microscopy, the smallest distance at which two adjacent objects can be distinguished as separate.
3. a measure of the fineness of detail that can be discerned in an image.

resolution

(rĕz′ə-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1. The clarity or fineness of detail that can be distinguished in an image, often measured as the number or the density of the discrete units, such as pixels or dots, that compose it.
2. Medicine The subsiding or termination of an abnormal condition, such as a fever or inflammation.

resolution (R)

Etymology: L, re + solvere, to solve
1 the state of having made a firm determination or decision on a course of action.
2 the ability of an imaging process to distinguish adjacent structures in an object. It is an important measure of image quality.
3 the ability of a chromatographic system to separate two adjacent peaks. The degree of separation between two peaks is represented by the symbol R.

resolution

The fourth and final phase of Masters and Johnson’s four-stage model of physiological responses to sexual stimulation, which follows orgasm, and is characterised by muscle relaxation, reduced heart rate and vasodilation. For most males, and some females, this is accompanied by the refractory period, in which further orgasm is physiologically impossible.

resolution

Clinical medicine The stage of a disease–often an infection, marked by subsidence of Sx

res·o·lu·tion

(rez'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. The arrest of an inflammatory process without suppuration; the absorption or breaking down and removal of the products of inflammation or of a new growth.
2. The optic ability to distinguish detail such as the separation of closely adjacent objects.
Synonym(s): resolving power (3) .
[L. resolutio, a slackening, fr. re-solvo pp. -solutus, to loosen, relax]

resolution

the minimum distance between two points at which they can be seen as such rather than as a single point. With the light microscope this is approximately half the wavelength of light used in illumination. Only with a shorter wavelength can greater resolution be achieved, as in the ELECTRON MICROSCOPE which gives a resolution of about 0.5 nm.

res·o·lu·tion

(rez'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. The arrest of an inflammatory process without suppuration.
2. The optic ability to distinguish detail.
Synonym(s): resolving power (3) .
[L. resolutio, a slackening, fr. re-solvo pp. -solutus, to loosen, relax]

resolution

1. subsidence of a pathological state, as the subsidence of an inflammation, or the softening and disappearance of a swelling.
2. perception as separate of two adjacent points; in microscopy, the smallest distance at which two adjacent objects can be distinguished as separate.

Patient discussion about resolution

Q. What's your 2009 New Year's resolution? Hello friends and members! I encourage you to share your thoughts, aspirations and resolutions for 2009 with us. Some of us want to spend more time with family and friends, quit smoking, lose weight, get in shape or just enjoy life. This is the place to get new ideas, be inspired and post your own thoughts to encourage others with their own goals. So, what's your New Year's resolution?

A. I hope to straighten out my marriage, my son's school troubles, get a better counselor for him, find out what is wrong with my husbands health and hopefully start feeling better myself. Just alot has been going on over the holidays that made them pretty crappy. So now it's time to change things. No ones going to do it but me...so I must get busy.

More discussions about resolution
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding this is one of the things that resolution discloses, resoluteness first gives to Dasein its authentic transparency.
Thomas Kelly's defense of resoluteness is based on his view that we are not rationally required to give equal weight to the opinions of our peers.
I left with a lot less question marks [than I had entered with] regarding the means, the timetable restrictions and America's resoluteness to deal with the problem," he said.
I left with a lot less question marks regarding the means, the timetable restrictions and American resoluteness.
The man replies with resoluteness and passion: "Doctor, for my health, nothing is too expensive.
Many analysts argued -- wrongly, it turns out -- that the Arizona senator's resoluteness on this issue would doom his candidacy, but that didn't stop him.
A number of points in Descartes's doctrine--his emphasis on resoluteness, his treatment of suspension of judgment, his view that we are most free when most strongly inclined by reason--are illuminated by reference to his contemporaries in the Catholic Reformation.
For example, accounts of those moved by the faithful resoluteness of Anabaptist martyrs were many, as the author points out.
I wish that Archbishop Raymond Burke and the rest of the Communion cops had had the chutzpah to protect our children from predator priests with the same single-minded resoluteness they have in denying "the sacraments to the unworthy.
One smiles at Schnyder's resoluteness, at the effort expended to capture the banality on canvas.
To the English Prisoner of War, Cochran Harry Adolf, from Prisoner Camp Bayreuth: We express herewith for the rescue done with courage, and resoluteness of the three-year-old child named Gugel, saving her from drowning in the Birnbaum Pond, Feilsbrom, District of Auch Gusbach, the acknowledgement of the War Office.
For example, Phillips does little to answer philosophers such as Habermas and Tugendhat, who claim that Heidegger's engagement with National Socialism is a reflection of the nihilistic voluntarism endorsed in his account of resoluteness in Being and Time.