resistive magnet

resistive magnet

An MRI term for a conventional magnet that generates a magnetic field based on principles of electromagnetism, and requires large current values and significant magnet coil cooling. Resistive magnets are typically limited to maximum field strengths of ± 0.6T.

Types
• Iron-core electromagnets—Vertically-oriented magnetic field, limited fringe field, little missile effect due to the closed iron-flux return path.
• Air-core electromagnets—Horizontally oriented fields with large fringe fields (unless magnetically shielded); prone to missile effects.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The resistive magnet is simple and has a low cost to construct; however it only produces small regions of low field strength when considerable power is used.
Resistive magnets for whole body imaging were therefore impractical at fields above about 0.18 Tesla, corresponding to a continuous power consumption of 40 Kilowatts, Black et al.
According to Jingping Chen, manager of the resistive magnet program at the magnet lab, the upgrade of the magnet is just a start, and that major upgrades are planned for many of the resistive magnets at the laboratory.
Resistive magnets are built in-house at the magnet lab using so-called Florida Bitter technology pioneered by researchers there.
But comparing with traditional resistive magnets or superconductive magnets pulsed technologies for high magnetic field generation is very attractive because do not require great investments [2].